"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Cookware and Accessories > Cookware
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 08-16-2011, 06:07 AM   #1
Senior Cook
 
danbuter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Pennsylvania
Posts: 350
Cast iron cleaning safety?

All the sources I've read say to just wipe a pan out and dry it. Won't this leave a danger of food poisoning the next time you cook?

__________________

__________________
danbuter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2011, 07:02 AM   #2
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: SE Pennsylvania
Posts: 4,655
the cooking process seems to take care of that. I use hot water and a stiff brush (no soap) if the pan is cruddy, but that is rare.
__________________

__________________
Robo410 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2011, 07:31 AM   #3
Chef Extraordinaire
 
pacanis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: NW PA
Posts: 18,751
You bring up an interesting point, dan.
I have always wondered why it is that we say a wipe is all that is necessary to "clean" CI, but everything else we wash. A glass casserole dish probably has less porosity than CI, but we would never think of simply wiping it out and putting it away.
__________________
Give us this day our daily bacon.
pacanis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2011, 07:40 AM   #4
Executive Chef
 
Selkie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Arkansas
Posts: 3,796
A glass casserole dish normally doesn't reach even one third the working temperature that a C.I. skillet does, which it far above the survival level for any bacteria! They are two different "utensils" used in two different environments.
__________________
"Food is our common ground, a universal experience." - James Beard
Selkie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2011, 08:09 AM   #5
Master Chef
 
jennyema's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Boston
Posts: 9,257
Quote:
Originally Posted by danbuter View Post
All the sources I've read say to just wipe a pan out and dry it. Won't this leave a danger of food poisoning the next time you cook?
If your pan is already well-seasoned it's perfectly fine to use dish soap and hot water. Make sure you dry it completely.

I never ever just wipe it. There's too much gunk in it.

I use hot water and a scrungie or hot water, soap and a scrungie.
__________________
Less is not more. More is more and more is fabulous.
jennyema is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2011, 08:14 AM   #6
Chef Extraordinaire
 
pacanis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: NW PA
Posts: 18,751
Quote:
Originally Posted by Selkie View Post
A glass casserole dish normally doesn't reach even one third the working temperature that a C.I. skillet does, which it far above the survival level for any bacteria! They are two different "utensils" used in two different environments.
That was just one example, but it really depends on what you are cooking with each one, doesn't it? Just because you are using a CI pan doesn't mean you are getting it screaming hot.
__________________
Give us this day our daily bacon.
pacanis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2011, 08:31 AM   #7
Head Chef
 
sparrowgrass's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Highest point in Missouri
Posts: 1,794
I think if you did a google for 'cast iron cleaning' you would find fifty zillion answers, pretty evenly divided between 'you will suffer the fires of eternal damnation if ever a particle of soap touches your cast iron' and 'meh--wash it, scrub it, whatever, just make it sure it is dry and has a very slight film of oil on it before you put it away'.

I use soap on mine, and a nylon scrubby if necessary. After washing, I put them on the burner until they are hot, and put a teeny bit of oil in the pan, which I spread around with a paper towel.

I think safety is really not an issue--the pan should be hot before you put food in it, generally, and bacteria won't survive. Onion and garlic flavors, however, do survive if you don't scrub the pan. Nothing like a pineapple upside down cake cooked in garlicky cast iron. Ask me how I know!
__________________
I just haven't been the same
since that house fell on my sister.
sparrowgrass is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2011, 08:39 AM   #8
Executive Chef
 
Hoot's Avatar
Site Moderator
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: The edge of the Great Dismal Swamp
Posts: 3,308
I agree with jennyema and sparrowgrass. If you are more comfortable washing your CI pan, by all means, do.
Be sure and dry it well, I use heat to dry mine and a light wipe of oil to keep the rust at bay if I am not going to be home to use the pan for a day or so.
I have some pans that have seen nearly daily use for a century or more. I believe it would take much more than a single washing with soap to remove the seasoning from those pans.
Remember, there isn't much you can do to really damage your cast iron pans short of cracking them or taking a torch to it.
__________________
Hoot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2011, 08:52 AM   #9
Master Chef
 
jennyema's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Boston
Posts: 9,257
Quote:
Originally Posted by sparrowgrass View Post
I think if you did a google for 'cast iron cleaning' you would find fifty zillion answers, pretty evenly divided between 'you will suffer the fires of eternal damnation if ever a particle of soap touches your cast iron' and 'meh--wash it, scrub it, whatever, just make it sure it is dry and has a very slight film of oil on it before you put it away'.

I use soap on mine, and a nylon scrubby if necessary. After washing, I put them on the burner until they are hot, and put a teeny bit of oil in the pan, which I spread around with a paper towel.

I think safety is really not an issue--the pan should be hot before you put food in it, generally, and bacteria won't survive. Onion and garlic flavors, however, do survive if you don't scrub the pan. Nothing like a pineapple upside down cake cooked in garlicky cast iron. Ask me how I know!

Exactly!!
__________________
Less is not more. More is more and more is fabulous.
jennyema is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2011, 08:54 AM   #10
Master Chef
 
jabbur's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Newport News, VA
Posts: 5,481
For a cooking utensil that has changed so little in over 100 years, I would think that if there were a big problem with bacteria, we would have heard about it. There are many food safety recommendations now that our grandmothers would scoff at! So I think you can be pretty comfortable with the CI pan since that hasn't changed in over 100 years.

I do use a bit of soap on my pans along with using the yellow sponge with green scrubber side to get off the stuck gunk. Never had a problem.
__________________

__________________
I could give up chocolate but I'm no quitter!
jabbur is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:01 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.