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Old 08-15-2009, 03:28 AM   #1
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Cast iron heatring?

For the past few days I have been searching for a Griswold cast iron skillet because I've heard they're the best. My searches led to me to certain skillets that have heat rings and others that do not. I have found a great #8 skillet that does not have a heat ring and I really want it. I'm not sure what the purpose of heat rings are but my guess would be to even distribute heat throughout the skillet? It also seems pans with heatrings are in much more demand.

Would a cast iron without a heat ring perform and heat up just as well as one with a heat ring? I'm really trying to own a skillet that is exceptional in cooking and exceptional all around. Should I wait for a skillet to come around with a heat ring?

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Old 08-15-2009, 06:55 AM   #2
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I believe the heat ring is designed for use on wood stoves that have a removable disk on top for cooking. The flat bottom pans are more appropriate for modern stoves. The ones with the heat ring are most likely more desirable because they are older.
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Old 08-15-2009, 07:37 AM   #3
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Its purpose was to raise the pan's bottom slightly from the old wood stove cook top so the heat would be equalized.
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Old 08-15-2009, 12:55 PM   #4
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As you intend to use the pan: if you have a gas or electric coil stove the heat ring will not be an issue. If you have a smooth top it will affect cooking somewhat, and may not activate induction tops properly.

If you find a Griswold at a reasonable price, buy it!
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Old 08-15-2009, 05:54 PM   #5
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Thank you all for your responses. I have a glass top cooking stove so I think a pan without a heat ring would suit me best. Question, the pan I am looking at is in really great condition but has some scratches and usage marks on the surface after it has been cleaned throughly. Is it possible to get these out?
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Old 08-15-2009, 10:01 PM   #6
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it's been used and you're going to use it. If it is not cracked, rusty beyond help, or lead coated, I'd get it.
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Old 08-16-2009, 12:23 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robo410 View Post
it's been used and you're going to use it. If it is not cracked, rusty beyond help, or lead coated, I'd get it.
This.

You really can't go wrong with a cast iron pan in decent shape, particularly an old Griswold.
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Old 09-08-2009, 05:23 PM   #8
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Cast Iron Cookware nowadays works on ALL ranges including induction. It absorbs heat evenly and spreads it gently while cooking. The new ones have porcelain enamel which makes it a fast, easy cleanup and they are oven safe up to 400 degrees fahrenheit. Great to cook with!
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Old 10-07-2009, 09:17 PM   #9
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Certain Griswolds are very collectible. I look for them just for cooking in, but sometimes you find one with a certain logo, and the price is sky high.
If you find one you like, I always soak it in oven cleaner in a garbage bag for a few days, then scrub it and re-season it. Just in case someone cooked something nasty in it.
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Old 10-03-2011, 11:07 AM   #10
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heat rings

Quote:
Originally Posted by bubbler33 View Post
For the past few days I have been searching for a Griswold cast iron skillet because I've heard they're the best. My searches led to me to certain skillets that have heat rings and others that do not. I have found a great #8 skillet that does not have a heat ring and I really want it. I'm not sure what the purpose of heat rings are but my guess would be to even distribute heat throughout the skillet? It also seems pans with heatrings are in much more demand.

Would a cast iron without a heat ring perform and heat up just as well as one with a heat ring? I'm really trying to own a skillet that is exceptional in cooking and exceptional all around. Should I wait for a skillet to come around with a heat ring?
Bubbler, usually the presence of a heat ring on a skillet would indicate that it was from 1940 or older. the purpose of the heat ring was for use on old time wood burning cook stoves to even out the heat. Once modern stoves came about the heat rings disappeared. The older skillets are better than anything being produced today. One reason for this is that back in the day, the cooking surface in the skillet of other cookware types was "evened out" and were quite a lot smoother than the current stuff which made them easier to season. Myself, if I had the choice of purchasing a #9 (or any other) with a heat ring, or one just like it without a heat ring, I would opt for the with, just because of the era in which it was produced.
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