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Old 12-23-2005, 09:24 AM   #11
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Cool

Quote:
Originally Posted by marmalady
Once you get that pot very well seasoned, you won't have to apply the thin layer of shortening at all. I have 2 skillets from my grandmother that are about 75 years old - they're so well seasoned, I've been known to throw them in the dishwasher - gasp! - on occasion!


Sorry, but not so fast.

I'd recommend oiling or greasing it now & then, especially if or when signs of
rust might rear its ugly head again.

Place it in the oven and let it "slow bake".
This gives the oil or shortening a chance to "cure" and harden on the surfface which will eliminate the smoke that you get everytime to are about to use it. Doing this also helps the pot to retain its non-stick qualities.


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Old 12-23-2005, 11:08 AM   #12
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(locking door as i leave marm and corey in the room together, then peeking in thru keyhole)

umm, corey, you're questioning marmalady??????

lol, i keep thinking of the old "it's not nice to fool with mother nature" commercials.

actually, my mother gave me one of my scottish aunt's old cast iron pans that was seasoned like marm said. you'd have to drill into it to hit oxidizeable metal.
i don't use it much, which is probably a shame, because it is kind of an heirloom. she was my favorite aunt, now since passed, and all i have to remember her by, besides wonderful childhood experiences, is that pan. she was the nurse who delivered me on buckytom:day 1, so i owe her my life as well as my unwavering love and respect.

also, i have a lodge pan of my own to use, and to keep her's company in the cupboard.
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Old 12-23-2005, 11:28 AM   #13
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Actually, that post was meant for someone else. Sorry about that, marmalady.

I quoted the wrong member. Someone wrote a post saying that their cast iron pot kept smoking when they were about to cook something in it after it was heated to temp for cooking.


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Old 12-23-2005, 04:52 PM   #14
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Well, I'm glad you cleared that up, Corey - i was about ready to invite you and whatever witness you chose to my house to see the cast iron skillet go into the dishwasher, and then onto the stove to cook just about anything!

Now, for everyone else- I DON'T recommend this for a relatively new pot/skillet, that, although seasoned well, would obviously lose its seasoning.

I do have a 'new' 12-inch Lodge skillet that never goes in the dishwasher!
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Old 12-24-2005, 12:43 PM   #15
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Actually, cast iron, so i've been told, isn't supposed to be wash in the dishwasher because of the strong possibility of rusting.

The chemical-laden strong detergents used for your machine could start to eat away at the seasoning in some areas, paving the way for rust to come back.

This will cause you to have to reseason the pan all over again to keep the rust at bay.


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Old 12-25-2005, 08:06 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Corey123
Actually, cast iron, so i've been told, isn't supposed to be wash in the dishwasher because of the strong possibility of rusting.
This will only happen if you do not dry the pan right away. If you put it away wet then you will get rust, but if you dry it completely right away then no need to worry.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Corey123
The chemical-laden strong detergents used for your machine could start to eat away at the seasoning in some areas, paving the way for rust to come back.

This will cause you to have to reseason the pan all over again to keep the rust at bay.


~Corey123.
While this is true of pans that do not have a strong seasoning, the same can not be said for a pan that is very well seasoned. A pan like the one Marm has probably has a seasoning strong enough that nothing short of a nuclear blast (and maybe not even that) will damage the pan.
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Old 12-26-2005, 10:42 AM   #17
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Yes, and don't store the pans under the sink either. If a leak occurs down there, the univited guest of rust will also thrive and plague the pan again.


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Old 01-01-2006, 12:04 PM   #18
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I have found that after washing a drying my wife uses spray cooking oil on the cast iron this works very well and they do not smoke.
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Old 01-01-2006, 12:44 PM   #19
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I've done that also, but only when I'm about to use the pan(s), such as for making pancakes.


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Old 01-19-2006, 03:42 AM   #20
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When I season I use lard. I figure that thats what kept Moms skillets working and they still do. Some of mine are over 25 years in my house and still in use. Oh yeah, I haven't seasoned them in many years, they don't yet need it.
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