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Old 12-28-2006, 07:57 AM   #1
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Cast Iron seasoning problems

Could anyone tell me why when I have seasoned a couple of my cast iron skillets it did not season evenly? There are some spots that seasoned well and some that looks like it did not. I have done other pans and have not had this problem but they were not as smooth as these pans. This last one that I have seasoned Last night and did it for the second time this morning I did at 400 degrees for 1 1/2 hours upside down in oven. Did another one at same time and it did fine. Does anybody have any suggestions? Would greatly appriciate it. Thank you, Bev

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Old 12-28-2006, 09:38 AM   #2
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I'd try using it and see what happens. You certainly can't harm it in the process.

FWIW, I think this whole pre-seasoning thing is a little over the top. I've never done anything more with a new cast iron pan than give it a good scrubbing with steel wool, soap and hot water, dry it thoroughly, coat the inside with Crisco, heat it on the stovetop until it starts to smoke, take it off the heat and once it's cooled scrub it again with steel wool and hot water, but no soap, and then start using it. It looks a little funky at first but over time it gets to look like a working pan.

Everyone's cast iron pans look a little different, depending on what kind of and how much fat they cook with, what temperatures they cook at, and how they wash them. There is no "correct" appearance.
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Old 12-28-2006, 12:07 PM   #3
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Cast iron takes a LOT of seasoning. That is why the ones passed down from parents, etc. are so prized. You just can't do it too much. And it doesn't happen all at once. I don't think I have ever seen 400* as a temp to be used, but it could be. Just use the skillet a lot--particularly if you are frying things.
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Old 12-28-2006, 02:40 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Veloce
I'd try using it and see what happens. You certainly can't harm it in the process.
...
Everyone's cast iron pans look a little different, depending on what kind of and how much fat they cook with, what temperatures they cook at, and how they wash them. There is no "correct" appearance.
I think Veloce is making a good point here. I have six cast iron pots or pans and they all look different because they are each used differently. After the first seasoning the effect always appeared more or less eneven and became more even with high fat use. I have a round griddle that is used like a comal at pretty high heat for tortillas and never sees cooking fat. The seasoning is constantly being burned off it. All I do is make sure to give it a thin coat of grease between uses to prevent rust.
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Old 12-28-2006, 04:25 PM   #5
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Thanks for the input. What is the best temp to season one?
I fried bacon in it this afternoon and it did wonderfully, clean up was a breeze so I guess it is pretty well seasoned.
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Old 12-28-2006, 04:33 PM   #6
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350F is what Lodge recommends.
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Old 12-28-2006, 04:47 PM   #7
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If your "iron" looks "blotchy" after seasoning...It is probably due to excess "oil" in someplaces...or not enough in another...After applying the oil/shortning use a paper towel to gently smooth it out out. An even coat is what you want.

It is not a big deal..it will work it self out as you use it. It will just look kinda funny for a short time.

You can re-season a couple of more times to darken it..but the blotches will probably remain.

Andy is correct...350* for 1 hour...then turn off oven and let it cool.

Lastly, don't use the "iron" for braising the first several times you use it.
Frying chicken/fish/etc works wonders....
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Old 02-12-2007, 02:13 PM   #8
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A little correction if you don't mind. Curing is when you throw it in the oven and cook it with oil (or lard if you really want that good tatse). Seasoning is what is happening to the pan every time it is used for cooking. Much the same way sports will have Seasoned Veterans... Well seasoned pot will be black as the night itself, but that takes years apon years to obtain. Just remember the basic care of your pot. Cure it, no soap, and a scrub pad. If you feel that it needs another cure, go for it!

Just my nickles opinion.
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