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Old 12-05-2008, 07:50 PM   #11
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a particle mask? This sounds a bit extreme. Any easy ideas to remove rust?

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Originally Posted by pacanis View Post
What Bill said. I had a DO get rusty one me and used a wire wheel on a hand grinder to clean it right up. Wear something old and a particle mask (besides eye protection). The rust dust will fill a room.
a particle mask? This sounds a bit extreme. Any easy ideas to remove rust?
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Old 12-05-2008, 10:17 PM   #12
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There are no real "easy" rules unless you want to take your piece to a place that does light sandblasting, but that's a bit extreme.

Still, if you use the methods already suggested, do the process outside. That will lessen the mess. Cast iron needs to be free of rust and cleaned properly to be ready to season. Don't let it put you off. You will be handsomely rewarded. A well-seasoned piece of cast iron is a piece of heaven. Far better than any of technology's Teflon creations.
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Old 12-06-2008, 08:36 AM   #13
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I use very very fine sandpaper when I want to clean mine. Or scouring powder and steel wool if it's bad. I have an old skillet that I regularly cleaned using 1000 grade sandpaper and it's as smooth as glass. I have taken it down to bare metal a few times. It doesn't take too much effort to season for things not to stick.

I've never been too hesitant about cleaning my skillet, I freqently clean it with soap as well, after it's had a few meals of cooking under it's belt, and as long as it's just a quick wipe and good rinse with hot water it's just fine.

If I soak it in dishwater, either on purpose or by accident, then it holds a soap taste until I clean it really good, so I try to avoid that.
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Old 12-08-2008, 12:01 AM   #14
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Originally Posted by margoc View Post
I use very very fine sandpaper when I want to clean mine. Or scouring powder and steel wool if it's bad. I have an old skillet that I regularly cleaned using 1000 grade sandpaper and it's as smooth as glass. I have taken it down to bare metal a few times. It doesn't take too much effort to season for things not to stick.

I've never been too hesitant about cleaning my skillet, I freqently clean it with soap as well, after it's had a few meals of cooking under it's belt, and as long as it's just a quick wipe and good rinse with hot water it's just fine.

If I soak it in dishwater, either on purpose or by accident, then it holds a soap taste until I clean it really good, so I try to avoid that.

Thankyou! Sandpaper I can do! Sandblasting and heavy chemical... not likely!

I may take a closer look at the ones I see rusty at the thrift shops!

Candy
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Old 12-14-2008, 08:35 AM   #15
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I would defiantly NOT use Navel Jelly, to me that stuff is too nasty to put on something I was going to eat out of.

I use "0000" steel wool to clean anything that has rust on it. A quick rub removes any rust and there is little if any residue. It won't scratch any hard surface and it's very inexpensive. I've used it for CI pans, chrome wheels on the car, to really shine up the porcelain on my Weber grill, it's great stuff. It's especially useful for cleaning up older carbon steel baking pans that you can get dirt cheap at garage sales. I picked up a rusty Kaiser Springform pan for $.50 once, a $60 pan looks good as new now. Home Depot or any paint store sells it.
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