"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Cookware and Accessories > Cookware
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 04-25-2006, 02:39 PM   #21
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 1
Talking Lodge

Quote:
Originally Posted by corazon90
do you own a cast iron skillet? I've never had one but it seems some people swear by them. I'm thinking of investing in one. What brand is yours? What are your likes & dislikes about it? I want all the dirty details! Thanks!
Lodge is all I own. I have several of them including a couple of their dutch ovens. You really owe it to your self to pick one up. Its the only way to make buttermilk cornbread, fry fish, chicken or cook outdoors over a open flame. Be sure to read the instructions on how to properly season your new pan. Look on eBay, might find a bargain. And finally, Never wash in water. just wipe out with paper towel and rub in oil with a paper towel. Use it often and it will be your best non stick high heat skillet.

v\r
Bumjim
__________________

__________________
bumjim2000 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-25-2006, 02:44 PM   #22
Chief Eating Officer
 
GB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: USA,Massachusetts
Posts: 25,509
When it comes time to buy one Cora, instead of looking in a kitchen store, check your local hardware store. They usually carry them and for a good price.
__________________

__________________
You know you can't resist clicking
this link. Your eyes will thank you. VISUAL BLISS
GB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-25-2006, 03:03 PM   #23
Master Chef
 
jennyema's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Boston
Posts: 9,277
Quote:
Originally Posted by bumjim2000
And finally, Never wash in water. just wipe out with paper towel and rub in oil with a paper towel. Use it often and it will be your best non stick high heat skillet.

v\r
Bumjim


It's perfectly ok to use water on cast iron. Lodge recommends using hot water and a stiff brush to clean their products. They say not to use "harsh detergents." I use dish soap on mine (they are well seasoned) when they need it and they are fine.

The key is to dry all the way. Some people lightly oil theirs, but I don't.
__________________
jennyema is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-25-2006, 03:13 PM   #24
Chief Eating Officer
 
GB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: USA,Massachusetts
Posts: 25,509
I agree with Jenny (what else is new ). Water is fine as long as you dry the pan completely after use. One way to do this is put it back on a hot burner after you wash it. Personally I just use a dish towel and wipe it down realy well.

The reason you need to keep it so dry is that it will rust if left wet.

I have never used soap on mine. I know that once the seasoning is built up then you can use soap, but I have never been able to bring myself to try. I am able to get it clean with just hot water and a paper towel. If I need some abrasive power then I will toss some salt in and use that to scrub it out. Some day I may get brave enough to try some soap, but I am not there yet.
__________________
You know you can't resist clicking
this link. Your eyes will thank you. VISUAL BLISS
GB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-25-2006, 03:19 PM   #25
Master Chef
 
jennyema's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Boston
Posts: 9,277


I don't use soap every time, but I'd be if i didn't get the gunk out from heavy use. Plus, mine are well seasoned. I'd not recommend soap until they are.

I think i told you that my mother put hers in the dishwasher. They are as slick as teflon. BUT DO NOT TRY THIS AT HOME!

And, even at Williams Sonoma a 12 inch Lodge skillet is only $24. I am sure you can find it cheaper at a hardware or camping store. Estate sales are also great places to find them.
__________________
jennyema is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-25-2006, 04:39 PM   #26
Chef Extraordinaire
 
mudbug's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: NoVA, beyond the Beltway
Posts: 11,166
corazon, I am shocked - SHOCKED - that a good cook like you doesn't have one already!

Listen to all these other people here. You won't be sorry.
__________________
Kool Aid - Think before you drink.
mudbug is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-25-2006, 05:48 PM   #27
Sous Chef
 
subfuscpersona's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 562
castiron - how do I love thee, let me count the ways...

I started counting the number of pieces of castiron cookware I own and ran out of fingers - 5 skillets (from a 6" mini to a #10, which is about 12" across - the #8 and #10 skillets also have castiron lids) - a saucepot, 2 dutch ovens, a mini dutch oven about 7"-8" diameter, a grill pan, a crepe pan and a muffin tin! A collection of many years in the making...

The mini dutch oven (has a pyrex lid) makes perfect rice and other cooked grain every time.

I use the flat side of the grill pan (preheated) in lieu of a baking stone for baking a baguette and the crepe pan as a baking surface for round or oval "artisan" bread or pizza.

I roast garlic on the stove top using castiron if it has a tight-fitting lid (a castiron lid is ideal) - I use a round cake rack on the bottom as a trivet to keep the garlic bulbs from direct contact with the bottom of the pan so they won't burn. Saves on preheating a large oven just to roast a bunch of garlic bulbs!

I use smaller skillets to dry-roast spices to make my own spice blends (you need a small electric coffee mill to grind the spices) and to toast small portions of sesame seeds, which are great sprinkled on vegetables.

Southern cooks love to cook their cornbread in a preheated castiron skillet (you throw in some lard in the preheated pan just before pouring in the batter and baking in the oven).

Sometimes ppl have skillets or pots they've inherited or picked up that don't have lids - Lodge sells castiron lids for skillets and dutch ovens - or you can often find pyrex lids that will fit your utensil, which I also use. A castiron lid is perfect for slow-heat long-cooking dishes cooked on top of the stove since heat is evenly applied from the top as well as the sides and bottom. Sometimes you can pick up lids on eBay. (BTW, Griswold castiron has become a collectors item and fetches mucho $$$ if in good condition.)

Castiron does take a little extra care - you shouldn't wash it in a dishwasher or let it soak a long time (though I will admit I'm not overly solicitous about caring for some of mine) and they seem to survive with periodic reseasoning.

My only problem - where do I store all this castiron cookware?
__________________
subfuscpersona is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-25-2006, 05:53 PM   #28
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Culpeper, VA
Posts: 5,806
I believe it was Food Network's Alton Brown who used 2 cast iron skillets - one fitting inside the other - to make a grilled cheese sandwich.
__________________
BreezyCooking is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-25-2006, 10:39 PM   #29
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,393
Quote:
Originally Posted by BreezyCooking
I believe it was Food Network's Alton Brown who used 2 cast iron skillets - one fitting inside the other - to make a grilled cheese sandwich.
Leave it to AB to find an unnecessarily difficult way to do a task.
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-26-2006, 12:02 AM   #30
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Texas
Posts: 5,296
Yep, own one my dad left me. I think it is a good gadget for the the 'ol bat belt!!! I love to cook with them where you sear a meat and finish cooking in the oven.... easy transition. Plus there is nothing better to cook cornbread in!

Nothing that I dislike, it is a tool in your tool box, as long as it is used properly, I see it as adding to my Craftman's tool set! (Forgive me, I do not know much about tools, using it as a metapho.)
__________________

__________________
sattie is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:57 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.