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Old 04-26-2006, 02:31 AM   #31
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You have me convinced! Thanks for all your wonderful & helpful responses! Special thanks to gb, who seems to have all the answers, you're always so helpful! And thanks for the nice compliment mudbug!
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Old 04-26-2006, 08:01 AM   #32
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Let us know once you buy one and we can walk you through the seasoning process and give you detailed instructions on how to care for it. It is not hard at all, but there are things that are important. You are going to love your cast iron I am sure!
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Old 04-26-2006, 11:12 AM   #33
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I am also rather new to cast iron cook ware, we purchased a set of cast iron fajita griller some months ago, it grilled the chicken, vegetables and pork so well we started to use it for many things other than fajita. We imagine fish would be great grilled on cast iron and would love to try it, however one thing I am rather concerned about is how to eliminate the fish smell afterwards without the usage of any soap. Lemon juice? baking soda? anyone has a suggestion for this?
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Old 04-26-2006, 11:16 AM   #34
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I wouldn't use lemon juice because the acid will eat away at the seasoning. I would just use a lot of hot water and some salt as an absasive. Hopefully that will take care of the smell.
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Old 04-26-2006, 11:20 AM   #35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urmaniac13
however one thing I am rather concerned about is how to eliminate the fish smell afterwards
I grill fish on it all the time. It only smells when you clean it after cooking the fish. The next item does not smell or taste like fish. I usually clean it with hot water and a non-abrasive spounge. I only use soap when it the smell is real bad.

GB is right the seasoning will be eaten away quickly by the acid in the lemon juice.
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Old 04-26-2006, 11:33 AM   #36
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I second that. I cook fish in mine all time. Have even shallow-fried oysters in them.

I put mine in the sink & fill it with hot water & let it sit for awhile - sometimes overnight. Next morning I just scrub it out with an un-soaped plastic scrub pad & let it air-dry thoroughly on the dish rack.

Have yet to have any lingering food odors of any kind in either my regular or grill pans.
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Old 04-26-2006, 11:51 AM   #37
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I have inherited Griswald of Erie PA (historically the finest) from my folks, and bought Wagner (now outa business) and Lodge. Maybe it's years of seasoning and use, but the Griswald has the smoothest surface. Lodge is the roughest...makes a difference with eggs.

Never use soap...scour with kosher salt if necessary.

Only once had the iron taste problem with acidic food.

season with lard, cook bacon, make baked beans, roast a chicken in it, cook up a mess of ham hocks and greens, sausage and peppers and onions...you will have a well seasoned pan!!! now make red sauce...it'll be ok. But don't let acidic foods sit in the pot or pan and cool down.
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Old 04-26-2006, 05:27 PM   #38
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Thanks GB, Lady C and Breezy for your advices!! We really wanted to try this as we are sure fish would be delicious cooked this way. Will try washing it away with lots of hot water and salt immediately when we do this, and no lemon juice... thanks again!!
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Old 05-01-2006, 12:10 PM   #39
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GB
Well that is the key breezy, it has to be very well seasoned. If it is then the seasoning is almost like a force field protecting the metal underneith. If the seasoning is not strong enough though then you will taste the metal.
I think that that is the key to using cast iron, seasoning. Most people feel they have to wash there pots and pans in soap and water. If you do your seasoning takes longer to build up. If I don't have to I don't wash my cast irons, I just wipe them with a dry cloth and if need be a slightly damp cloth.

If, however, I feel that I just can't get away without soap and water, I make sure that they are completely dry after washed and an ample supply of my favorite seasoning formula applied...

Oh ya, did I say "SEASON"???
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Old 05-01-2006, 01:02 PM   #40
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Upon purchase, my Lodge Cast Iron was fairly rough textured. I thought it would create problems. But after seasoning, eggs slid around in the pan just as well as they do in my old Wagner pans. Also, the cooking surface has become very smooth after just a couple years of use. It didn't take a lifetime of cooking to get the pans smooth.

What I like about the Lodge brand, is the metal thickness. Although it takes longer to heat up than does a thinner pan, it has more thermal mass. That is, there are more molecules in an agitated state (hot metal). That means that more heat can be quickly delivered to the food for a longer period of time before the metal cools.

This is important when adding colder food to the hot pan. It doesn't rapidly cool the pan. Your cooking oil will therefore maintain a more even temperature when frying chicken, or cooking bacon, or a stew. The downside to this is making sure that the temperature is right to begin with. If the pan is too hot, it will burn foods excepionally well.

As with any tool, it just takes time to learn its properties, and how best to use it. It has strengths and weaknesses. But as most of us have learned around here, cast iron is cheap, sturdy, and works very well for most cooking chores. But if you're used to cooking pancakes on a large, teflon-coated electric griddle, you're likely to burn the first few pancakes on your cast iron pan, until you learn how to adjust your stove properly for the item being cooked.

I agree, buy the cast iron. My cast iron pans are the most widely used cooking vessels in my kitchen, though I have many types. I use them fro everything from searing beef to baking pizza, and even use them over charcoal when the meal requires the smoke, but not the direct infra-red heat emitted by the charcoal. It also works great over a campfire, as long as you have something to support its weight.

Oh, and a cast iron dutch oven, with the flat lid can be used when camping to mimick an oven. By placing the correct amount of hot coals under and on the flat lid, you control the temperature and can bake cakes, make casseroles, and bake breads, or coblers. Or, you can make a dandy stew or boiled dinner as well. And then again, it works great in your kitchen oven. Now just how verstile can you get.

Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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