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Old 09-30-2018, 12:10 PM   #21
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That's a good point Caslon, and I've had the same experience. The pans that I haven't done much oil frying in (1/4" or deeper) are the stickiest. My big skillet used for shallow deep fry and my flat griddle I use for burgers, etc. are my best seasoned pans.
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Old 10-01-2018, 10:55 AM   #22
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I've never seen rust from a pan sitting idle.

Me, neither until I moved part time to Cape Cod. Its insanely humid here ….
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Old 10-04-2018, 11:34 AM   #23
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I'm still finding my comfort zone with cast iron. My mother was a decent home cook, but I never way her use a CI pan of any kind, so I didn't grow up with it. I finally bought one about a year ago, in part from reading about it so often on this forum.

My CI skillet is not as nonstick as a new teflon pan, but it is as good as my ~8 year old Bakers & Chefs 12" nonstick fry pan (bought at Sam's Club, but also available from Amazon). It's a Lodge brand, came preseasoned, and I put it through a full normal oven seasoning before I used it the first time.

After cooking with it, I wash in hot water and I use a stainless steel chain mail scrubber to rub off any chunks, then just a dishrag, rinse, dry with a paper towel, then on the stovetop with a light coating of oil all over just until it's fairly hot.

It lives in a drawer in the bottom of the stove along with the broiler pan and my pizza stone.
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Old 12-05-2018, 10:47 AM   #24
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It would take a monumental amount of polymerized (basically burned in) oil to fill in the surface of most new cast iron pans to a point of slickness. There are some premium pans out there for which this MIGHT not be the case. Proteins will release from a properly heated pan, even if it's bumpy, so as long as you understand how to cook this shouldn't be too much of a problem.

All this being the case, you should just start cooking in the pan. One or two seasoning sessions won't do much of anything given the state of the surface of the pan in the first place.

An alternative would be a French black steel pan which comes smooth as a baby's bottom right out of the box, but won't recall the days of wagon trains heading out west like cast iron will.
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Old 12-05-2018, 01:05 PM   #25
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Cast iron rusts if you look at it cross-eyed. A couple of initial seasonings covering the entire pan, inside and out, with at least keep the rut at bay while you build up a good coating.
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Old 12-05-2018, 01:11 PM   #26
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Cast iron rusts if you look at it cross-eyed. A couple of initial seasonings covering the entire pan, inside and out, with at least keep the rut at bay while you build up a good coating.
I think the pan in question has at least the factory seasoning, which I understand covers all of the pan, surely this is enough to prevent storage rust. That said, these pans as well as carbon steel pans, need to be put on a burner or the oven and dried out after use, assuming they were rinsed with water. I do this even on well-used carbon steel.


Not a fan of bare CI. Carbon steel has its uses.
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Old 12-05-2018, 01:23 PM   #27
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My comment assumed a raw ci pan. The last ci skillet I bought was factory seasoned. I just started cooking in it.
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Old 12-05-2018, 01:28 PM   #28
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My new CI skillet (seasoned) didn't stay non-stick when I cooked bacon, thinking it would. It wasn't until I oil fried some chicken that my CI pan got non stick.
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Old 12-05-2018, 07:28 PM   #29
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Caslon,
Bacon now days that you commonly find is sugar cured that part of why cooked bacon or heavy sugared BBQ turns sticky and becomes a gooey mess that makes it hard to clean. When I restore a older one I like to just sauté vegetables stove top and brown chicken, pork a couple of minutes per side then in a temp ready oven to finish,,, and after a couple months it becomes a lot more slick and darker of course.

I Myself cooking with a new restored one or off the shelf uncooked in type skillets I use a wee bit more oil and needed till the skillet starts to keep and hold it’s own so to speak.

Oddly I was just restoring one and finished seasoning it today. I’t was found and mismatched by makers, the price was right and I wanted to lid for one I use a lot.

Keep in mind you can turn what looks like trash to treasure that will out live you.
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Old 12-05-2018, 07:50 PM   #30
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Just a quick picture of the lid I just found as is before cleaning
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