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Old 12-26-2005, 10:54 AM   #1
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Cast iron wok Q's

Having never owned any cast iron pans I really don't know how to utilize this one. Wifey bought me a HUGE 15" Bodum cast iron wok for x-mas. I really like it! I always tend to over do it when I make stir fry and make way too much. This wok will make it easier to make all that food in fewer batches.

Anyway, First I opened the box and removed the wok, lid, and instructions. In the instructions it states this wok is only to be used with sterno burners. What's the deal with that? It fits so well on my high output burner on the stove. It has a very big heat sink on the bottom that's about 6" and 3/16" thick. The whole wok is really heavy. I don't see any reason not to use it on my range, do you?

Also, the wok came un-seasoned. The instructions said to "Carefully heat the wok with an abundant coating of oil, then let is stand for a while. Once the wok has cooled down, wipe off any excess oil with a paper towel. Well, I did that. I used peanut oil since it withstands more heat. The cooking surface is so rough that it started to shread the paper towel. Am I missing something here? I thought the surface was supposed to be more slick than that.

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Old 12-26-2005, 11:27 AM   #2
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Hi Home chef, I will just speak to one of your points and let someone else answer the other ones.

The surface will start out rough. Over time as you develop the seasoning it will become more and more slick. As the fat fills in the little pits then eventually it will become very smooth and extremely non stick. This does take some time so have patience. The more you use the wok the faster it will happen. try deep frying something in it as that is a great way to develop that seasoning.
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Old 12-26-2005, 11:49 AM   #3
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Thanks, G

A few more Q's...

1. I read in another post to actually 'bake' the oil/grease/fat into the pan in the oven for an hour or so. Would this be a good idea for this wok?

2. Is Bodum a good brand of cookware? I usually get Berndes but wifey got a GREAT deeal on this Bodum. She said she paid $48.00 for it and that included a glass lid, chopsticks (which I will never use) and a rach that sits on the lip of the wok to help keep items warm. Not too bad I think.
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Old 12-26-2005, 09:39 PM   #4
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Yeah baking the fat into the pan would not be a bad way to go. basically what you would want to do is warm up the wok then coat with Crisco. cover every surface inside and out. Stick it in a 350 oven with something under it to catch drips (a cookie sheet works well, but I usually just put a piece of aluminum foil) and bake for an hour or so then shut off the oven and let the pan sit overnight. I usually do this just before I go to bed. That is a great way to season any cast iron product.

With a wok, deep frying something is a great way also. Either way will work great. Doing both will work even better.

I have never had any Bodum, but from what I have seen and heard they make a very good product. You will have to let us know.
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Old 12-27-2005, 02:35 PM   #5
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I don't understand why you would want to season the outside as well.
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Old 12-27-2005, 02:37 PM   #6
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Keeps it from rusting.
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