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Old 01-26-2005, 11:55 AM   #1
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Copper Cookware

Is any one familiar with Hammersmith Cookware http://www.hammersmithcookware.com/.
Their prices seem very reasonable. They are the last USA made copper cookware. I would appreciate any comments. I decided I could put up with tinned rather than stainless steel interior.

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Old 01-26-2005, 01:48 PM   #2
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Think about a tin interior. The piece can't be used if the tin is compromised. So figure in a lifetime of $$ and trouble of re-tinning when you figure the value of the cookware.
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Old 01-26-2005, 10:41 PM   #3
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Would love to get a small copper bowl for the express purpose of whipping eggwhites/meringues in one.

But the price o_O.
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Old 01-26-2005, 11:00 PM   #4
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Re: Copper Cookware

Thanks for the link to their website. After browsing their website I could not find mention of the thickness of the cookware. I know Bourgeat copper cookware with the stainless steel lining is 2.5mm thick and some people consider anything less to be inadequate for most cooking chores.
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Old 01-27-2005, 08:09 AM   #5
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I've been looking at copper cookware for several (20+) years and it's on my list of the first 10 things to get when I win the lottery. But, I would get the stainless steel rather than the tin lined. As jennyema pointed out, tinned copper has to be retinned from time to time .... and as hammersmith pointed out on their website, it's not something many people can do.
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Old 01-28-2005, 09:18 AM   #6
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I have tin lined copper that I've had for about 25 years. It was the only copper available at that time.

I haven't used the skillets in a number of years because they need re-tinning and I can't get it done anymore. There are a couple places in the U.S. that I found on the internet that will do it, but the price plus shipping is nearly the price of a new pan.

A few years down the road, if you can't get it re-tinned, all that wonderful copper will be good for nothing but home decor!
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Old 01-31-2005, 04:53 PM   #7
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Tin Lined Copper - Postscript

I knew if I looked for it I would find the notes I had on tin lined copper. Tin is a soft metal - so it scratches and wears away easily (like a cheap nonstick Teflon coating) - and it melts at only 450-F!
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Old 02-04-2005, 12:56 PM   #8
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wep896, and everyone

Thanks for the info. I contacted the factory to find the thickness. It is availble in either .064" (1.6 mm) or .125" (3.2 mm) your choice. On pots larger than 6 quarts / 13" diameter iit is standard .125".

Mike
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Old 02-04-2005, 08:20 PM   #9
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IMHO - if I was going to get copper cookware .... I would go for the thickest copper exterior and Stainless Steel lining.

Aside from the other things already mentioned (tin is soft and scratches easily, has to be replaced (re-tinned) from time to time, and melts at a relatively low temperature) ... I just read something in a book I just got this week, Cookwise by Shirley Corriher. Seems, there is a chemical reaction between tin and green veges that cause them to turn that funky olive drab color (think about the color of green beans out of a tin can). In old "classic" French cookbooks they used to say to cook green veges in an unlined copper pot to retain color ... but modern science has shown that it's not safe to do that because of an increase in copper being leached into the veges and ingested ... and copper is hard for the body to get rid of.

Anyway - it's one more thing to think about.
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Old 02-05-2005, 11:35 AM   #10
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Tin is a soft metal that I have some experience with. It is combined with lead in electrical solder and melts at a relativel low temperature. It also bonds with copper well (hence its use in soldering applications). If you have sufficinet heat, some good flux, a supply of tin, and a hot enough heat source, re-tinning isn't difficult. Unfortunately, most of us, me included, have no sources for tin. Plus, soldering and tinning are both learned skills and must be done correctly to creat an even layer of tin, and complete bonding of the two metals.

Go with the copper encapulated, or multi-ply SS pans.


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