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Old 09-04-2006, 09:25 PM   #11
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Glass or stone, like Corian, was "fashionable" for "sanitary" cutting boards awhile ago. Not recommended unless you are using knives you don't mind blunting--but those old-fashioned softer carbon steel quick-rust knives blunted pretty easily, even on wooden boards, and lots of folks used carving knives right on the porcelain serving platter, so I guess they made sense at the time.
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Old 09-04-2006, 11:00 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GB
While Fryboy says that recent studies have shown that wood actually more sanitary than plastic boards there are just as many studies that show the opposite.
The study I cited is from the University of California, Davis, Food Safety Laboratory.

Here's the most recent NON-COPYRIGHTED PUBLIC information on the subject from the United States Department of Agriculture's Food Safety & Inspection Service:



Cutting Boards and Food Safety

Which is better, wooden or plastic cutting boards? Consumers may choose either wood or a nonporous surface cutting board such as plastic, marble, glass, or pyroceramic. Nonporous surfaces are easier to clean than wood.

Avoid Cross-Contamination
The Meat and Poultry Hotline says that consumers may use wood or a nonporous surface for cutting raw meat and poultry. However, consider using one cutting board for fresh produce and bread and a separate one for raw meat, poultry, and seafood. This will prevent bacteria on a cutting board that is used for raw meat, poultry, or seafood from contaminating a food that requires no further cooking.

Cleaning Cutting Boards
To keep all cutting boards clean, the Hotline recommends washing them with hot, soapy water after each use; then rinse with clear water and air dry or pat dry with clean paper towels. Nonporous acrylic, plastic, or glass boards and solid wood boards can be washed in a dishwasher (laminated boards may crack and split).

Both wooden and plastic cutting boards can be sanitized with a solution of 1 tablespoon of unscented, liquid chlorine bleach per gallon of water. Flood the surface with the bleach solution and allow it to stand for several minutes. Rinse with clear water and air dry or pat dry with clean paper towels.

Replace Worn Cutting Boards
All plastic and wooden cutting boards wear out over time. Once cutting boards become excessively worn or develop hard-to-clean grooves, they should be discarded.

Last Modified: May 23, 2006
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Old 09-04-2006, 11:32 PM   #13
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All my cutting boards are white poly. They go into the dishwasher after every use. The DW has a Sanitize cycle I use when the cutting board has been used for raw meat.

I also bleach the boards periodically to remove stains and to ensure the boards are as clean as possible.
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Old 09-05-2006, 12:20 AM   #14
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Glass, corian, stone, ceramic - the harder the surface the more damage it will do to your knives. Carving on a ceramic platter 1-2 times a year isn't a problem. Using a hard surface to cut on every day IS a problem.

Plastic and wood are not as destructive to the edge of your knives (end grain wood/bamboo are not as destructive as edge grain).

Wood, if properly cleaned and maintained, is just as sanitary, if not more so, than plastic (according to many studies). White vinegar (5%) is just as effective as bleach-water for "sanatizing".

"... solid wood boards can be washed in a dishwasher (laminated boards may crack and split)." Humm ... obviously the USDA doesn't know anything about wood - they should have consulted another Govt. agency, or maybe Norm at the New Yankee Workshop, or Bob Villa - or anyone else who knows anything about wood - even the guys at your local lumber yard. Solid wood boards, when subjected the to heat and moisture of a dishwasher will warp, twist, and split!
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Old 09-05-2006, 08:21 PM   #15
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I guess that brings us to the question..... which material is the best/smartest/safest to use and WHY ??????

Bob J
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Old 09-05-2006, 08:31 PM   #16
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It is a toss up between plastic and wood (end grain being best). Both have their good points and bad points, but are equal in my book.
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Old 09-05-2006, 08:40 PM   #17
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I have two large plastic boards, which I keep under the counter and pull out when I need them, and them they go into the dishwasher.

I also have two end-grain bamboo boards on the counter (and to heck with the USDA, no bleach will ever touch them!). I do wash them with soap and hot water after cutting any meat on them, and I oil them with mineral oil now and then to keep them in good condition.

I've found that the bamboo is almost impervious to cuts, which helps keep them sanitary, yet it's soft enough to avoid dulling my knives.
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Old 09-05-2006, 09:27 PM   #18
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I have one similar to one you are describing, and I do not use it for cutting -- just misc. stuff. I own one medium sized plastic board that I use only for raw meats/poultry, and a larger wooden one that I use for everything else.

When I decide to upgrade, I think I'll pick me up one of these in walnut.
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Old 09-05-2006, 10:44 PM   #19
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I use all plastic boards for convenience. No splitting, no oiling. Dishwasher safe.
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