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Old 12-10-2008, 05:24 PM   #21
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So, Andy, is filtering not an issue or necessity? The few times I've fried things in a pot on the stove, there don't seem to be that many bits left in the oil. How many times can you use the oil before you have to change it? I'm also guessing you refrigerate it ... ? Oh my ...
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Old 12-10-2008, 05:34 PM   #22
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Most of the bits just sink beneath the heating element which supports the basket about 1/2" off the bottom. I usually know when to change the oil by the taste of the food I make in the fryer. If I was making something really important and had questionable oil, I would just change it...
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Old 12-10-2008, 06:27 PM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JMediger View Post
So, Andy, is filtering not an issue or necessity? The few times I've fried things in a pot on the stove, there don't seem to be that many bits left in the oil. How many times can you use the oil before you have to change it? I'm also guessing you refrigerate it ... ? Oh my ...

I don't refrigerate it.

How many times you can reuse the oil depends a great deal on what you are frying. High protein items such as meats, poultry and fish cause the oil to deterioriate more quickly than frying potaotes, onion rings, green tomatoes, fritters, etc.

With each reuse, the oil will darken slightly and its smoke point will drop. That's why you should use an oil with a higher smoke point. It gives you a safety margin.

Depending on what you fry, there may not be a lot if residue in the bottom of the container.
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Old 12-10-2008, 06:38 PM   #24
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Ditto what Andy said.

I don't filter or refrigerate. I use peanut oil. I buy it at wally world in a 2.5(?) gal container. It lasts quite a while, but I only deep fry potatoes anymore, never anything with breading. When it starts looking too dark I do a major cleanup and pour new oil in.
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Old 12-10-2008, 06:48 PM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JMediger View Post
So, Andy, is filtering not an issue or necessity? The few times I've fried things in a pot on the stove, there don't seem to be that many bits left in the oil. How many times can you use the oil before you have to change it? I'm also guessing you refrigerate it ... ? Oh my ...
In my opinion, if you plan to reuse your cooking oil, it should be filtered after every use. Each time you use the oil, small particles of food and breading become suspended in the oil. They may settle to the bottom, but as soon as you reheat the oil they become suspended again. If not filtered out, these particles may cause the oil to become rancid. Additionally, when you reheat the oil, they will burn, reducing the smoking point of the oil and producing off flavors in your food. It isn't necessary to refrigerate the filtered oil.

Also, if you're going to reuse the oil, it's important to select one with a high smoke point because every time you use it, its smokepoint will be reduced. For price and availability, I recommend refined canola oil. Here's a reference chart: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Smoke_point
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Old 12-10-2008, 07:49 PM   #26
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A plain heavy aluminum pot will work wonders.
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