"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Cookware and Accessories > Cookware
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 04-20-2006, 12:34 PM   #11
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Culpeper, VA
Posts: 5,806
So if you're not using it for frying or stirfries, what are you using your non-stick wok for? Really - I'm curious. Because I can't figure out what use a non-stick wok would have that couldn't be filled by a regular non-stick skillet.

Oh & I agree about the bamboo steamers. I use my 3-tiered bamboo steamer in my wok quite frequently. Makes the BEST steamed dumplings/dim sum.
__________________

__________________
BreezyCooking is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-20-2006, 12:44 PM   #12
Chief Eating Officer
 
GB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: USA,Massachusetts
Posts: 25,509
As mentioned above steaming and boiling are great uses, but my favorite use is when i made my chicken broccoli ziti dish. I made the sauce in the non stick wok then add the broccoli and chicken at the appropriate time and toss it all together. This would be very difficult with other pans because this recipe makes a lot. Clean up is a breeze because it is non stick. No worries about that eaither because the heat does not need to go past medium.
__________________

__________________
You know you can't resist clicking
this link. Your eyes will thank you. VISUAL BLISS
GB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-20-2006, 12:48 PM   #13
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Culpeper, VA
Posts: 5,806
Ah - I never thought of tossed/mixed pasta dishes. I agree - it would be great for that.
__________________
BreezyCooking is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-20-2006, 12:51 PM   #14
Chief Eating Officer
 
GB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: USA,Massachusetts
Posts: 25,509
Yeah I really enjoy it for things that I am tossing together because the wide mouth of the wok makes it a lot less likely that things will be dumped when tossing. More stays in the pot this way
__________________
You know you can't resist clicking
this link. Your eyes will thank you. VISUAL BLISS
GB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-20-2006, 11:30 PM   #15
Executive Chef
 
Corey123's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: East Boston, MA.
Posts: 2,881
Thumbs up

Quote:
Originally Posted by BreezyCooking
So if you're not using it for frying or stirfries, what are you using your non-stick wok for? Really - I'm curious. Because I can't figure out what use a non-stick wok would have that couldn't be filled by a regular non-stick skillet.

Oh & I agree about the bamboo steamers. I use my 3-tiered bamboo steamer in my wok quite frequently. Makes the BEST steamed dumplings/dim sum.


The wok has very high sides which allow you to toss and flip the food as you stir fry it.

I also have a huge nonstick 14" restaurant-stye skillet, but I won't part with it mainly because of its monster size - which also allows me to toss and flip food in it.

I just bought two Asian spatulas to use with mine, BTW.


~Corey123.
__________________
Corey123 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-21-2006, 09:17 AM   #16
Head Chef
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Bloomington, IN
Posts: 1,129
Send a message via AIM to college_cook
I have been using my for high-heat stir-fries mostly. From the sounds of things, I think I may have been lucky that my wok has lasted as long as it has.

So in the near future I guess I will be buying a high-carbon steel wok, anything I should look for when purchasing? Also any tips you have on seasoning it would be great.

Oh, and thanks to everyone for their input!
__________________
college_cook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-21-2006, 11:17 AM   #17
Senior Cook
 
BrianMorin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Canada
Posts: 277
Send a message via MSN to BrianMorin Send a message via Yahoo to BrianMorin Send a message via Skype™ to BrianMorin
Quote:
Originally Posted by college_cook
I have been using my for high-heat stir-fries mostly. From the sounds of things, I think I may have been lucky that my wok has lasted as long as it has.

So in the near future I guess I will be buying a high-carbon steel wok, anything I should look for when purchasing? Also any tips you have on seasoning it would be great.

Oh, and thanks to everyone for their input!
It looks to me that your only about 11 miles or so from Indianapolis? If they have a oriental district (I like the Chinese woks) you might like to look around there. You can probably find a good basic (basic is best) wok right there.

To season, you just make sure that after you've finished cooking, scrap off all excess matter, oil, burnt on food, etc., with a dry cloth or even a brush, if need be, then a dry cloth. If you must use soap and water, but if you can avoid it do. If you do use water make sure that you dry it completely. I use dry dish cloths, the ones I use to wash dishes with, but when they are dry. After this, which souldn't take more than a minute, I use a brush with a litte bit of 50/50 extra virgin olive oil and liquid lecithin. This, for me, is better that any spray that I have ever used. Although the sparys are ok.
__________________
Bri

Aad Sach Sing

- "History is a set of lies agreed upon" - Napoleon Bonaparte
- "History is the lie commonly agreed upon," - Voltaire
- Quis cusodiet ipsos custodes? - Who will guarde the guards? (Latin expression)
BrianMorin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-24-2006, 12:28 AM   #18
Master Chef
 
Michael in FtW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Fort Worth, TX
Posts: 6,592
Sometimes there is just no reason to reinvent the wheel ... Kasma Loha-unchit says everything I could in Wok: Use and Care and Wok: Flat or Round Bottom and Wok: Seasoning and Care.

The best wok I ever had was spun carbon steel that had little concentric ridges up the inside instead of being totally smooth. The lady at the Asian market told me that this was the best because as I cooked something and pulled it up the side of the pan the ridges would help hold the food there instead of it sliding back to the bottom of the pan like a smooth pan would.

As for cleaning - I watched the guys in action at my favorite Chinese restaurant ... they actually had closed circuit TV so you would watch the action in the kitchen while you waited for a table. After they dumped the food out they added some water, scrubbed the pan with a bamboo brush, dumped the water out, gave the wok a quick wipe with a rag, and they were good to go for the next dish. NEVER use soap in it once it is seasoned!

You live in an area which should have a good Asian market where you can find a good wok. Break out the old phone book and make a few calls - with the price of gas these days it's a lot cheaper to let your fingers do the walking!
__________________
"It ain't what you don't know that gets you in trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so." - Mark Twain
Michael in FtW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-24-2006, 12:36 PM   #19
Senior Cook
 
BrianMorin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Canada
Posts: 277
Send a message via MSN to BrianMorin Send a message via Yahoo to BrianMorin Send a message via Skype™ to BrianMorin
Michael in FtW;

Thanks for the great links for woking. How would I ever have know that, not only do I have the wrong type of ring for my wok but, even thought I use it like everyone else I have ever seen (homes, tv, etc) I now believe I have been using it wrong. I will now buy a new ring and... turn it over.
__________________
Bri

Aad Sach Sing

- "History is a set of lies agreed upon" - Napoleon Bonaparte
- "History is the lie commonly agreed upon," - Voltaire
- Quis cusodiet ipsos custodes? - Who will guarde the guards? (Latin expression)
BrianMorin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-25-2006, 10:38 PM   #20
Master Chef
 
Michael in FtW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Fort Worth, TX
Posts: 6,592
Glad I could help, Bri - that is a great site and I don't know how to improve on what is said there.

Depending on how serious you are about wok cooking, and what brand-model stove you have - there are also special wok elements available. In Western cooking we are looking for even heat distribution across the bottom of a flat pan - in wok cooking the idea is to concentrate the heat inward to the center of the pan.

For electric stoves, there are plug-in concave elements (usually run about $50) and replace the 8-inch element - and you don't need to use a ring, the wok fits directly into the bowl formed by the heating element.

For gas stoves - there are two versions - and range from $65-&85 (although some are in the $150 - $250 range). Some are simple (just lift off the gas burner ring and replace it with the wok ring) and some you have to break out a wrench and replace a little more hardware.

I posted links to a source for both of these (electric and gas) a year or two ago - but I can't find it now. I know we pruned some old threads so this might have been one that went into the ether.
__________________

__________________
"It ain't what you don't know that gets you in trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so." - Mark Twain
Michael in FtW is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:06 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.