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Old 11-28-2007, 09:02 PM   #11
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Seasoning a cast-iron pan doesn't do anything to make it non-stick. It simply places a gum on the pan so it doesn't corrode.

The secret to having eggs not stick to a non-non-stick surface is two things: oil and heat. You simply must have some oil and that oil must be pretty hot. Not burning, but definitely higher than low heat. I use 7/10 when doing eggs.

Yes, you'll have to use a decent amount of butter or fat. If you want to omit that, use a non-stick pan.

Why egg whites with no oil, btw? Cholesterol concerns? Are you a body builder?

-Stooxie
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Old 11-28-2007, 09:14 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stooxie View Post
Seasoning a cast-iron pan doesn't do anything to make it non-stick. It simply places a gum on the pan so it doesn't corrode.
I have to strongly disagree with this. A well seasoned CI pan is as non stick if not more so than a used Teflon pan.
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Old 11-28-2007, 09:33 PM   #13
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I have to strongly disagree with this. A well seasoned CI pan is as non stick if not more so than a used Teflon pan.
We're probably talking about two different things, then. The process the OP mentioned is not going to create a non-stick surface on the first go around.

The famed cast iron pans, black from a generation of use, are fairly non-stick due to carbon build up. This happens in the same way a carbon steel wok becomes non stick.

My point was that it takes a relatively long time to make that happen and until that point oil and heat will be necessary. In fact, oil and heat are the very two things that keep and cast iron pan seasoned, anyway. How do you re-season a cast iron pan? Throw it in the oven covered in lard.

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Old 11-28-2007, 09:36 PM   #14
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Well I agree that it will not be non stick on the first go around and that it will take repeated use. I will also agree that heat and fat (doesn't have to be oil) are important as well.

It is not carbon build up that makes it non stick though. It is fat getting into the pours of the CI.
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Old 11-28-2007, 10:03 PM   #15
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Well, Stooxie - you only wind up with a gummy mess in the bottom of the pan if you don't season it properly. You rub the fat into the metal, wipe off the excess, and bake the pan upside down at high enough temp and for long enough ... you wind up with a nice hard dry surface. In time, the voids and peaks will be evened out and you have a very hard, slick surface.

No, seasoning is not a build-up of carbon. It is layers of polymerized fat that fuses first to the metal and then builds up by bonding one layer upon another. That's why you build a basic layer of "seasoning" and then fry food in it to build up the layers. You are, in fact, creating your own non-stick surface of natural edible fats ... one molecular layer at a time.
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Old 11-29-2007, 10:50 AM   #16
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I have used non-seasoned cast iron in my house after a proper seasoning and found a very good non-stick surface. I was concerned that a new Lodge frying pan that I had purchased would be a pain to use until the seasoning built enough to get rid of the grainy texture of the sand-cast metal. But after seasoning it, I just rubbed it before cooking with a bit of oil on a paper towel. I then placed my eggs, or whatever I was cooking, into the pan and prepared it as I usually do. The results surprized me. The pan was very easy to use, and almost nothing stuck to it, grainy texture or not. The pan is now smooth to the touch from a few years of cooking, and I still treat it the same way. I simply wipe the cooking surface with oil before cooking and nothing sticks. I only use more fat if I want to taste, say, butter in the food, or bacon fat, etc.

And, as a point of fact, non-stick pans recomend that you wipe a sheen of fat onto the pan before cooking. Sound familiar?

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Old 12-11-2007, 08:38 PM   #17
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My favorite way of cooking my eggs is in my cast iron pan. Of course it's been aged for over 50 years, but here's how I do it. I heat up the pan and put in just a little olive oil(probably no more that 1/2 t. ) I heat the pan until it just is starting to smoke, and then shut it off, and put in my 3-4 beaten eggs. Pull the sides of the eggs to the center while it cooks. They turn out beautifully and they NEVER stick. Of course that's just for 2 people.
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Old 12-12-2007, 11:06 AM   #18
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I LOVE my cast iron pans! I did some research and opted not to buy new Lodge cast iron. I bought a nice basic Griswold pan, a no. 8, on eBAY by a guy who listed it incorrectly so I got a really great deal on it. I later found a Wagner at a thrift store that I keep in the camper. Then I found another Wagner, a really big one, at the thrift store that I use at home. I use it everyday. I love it! I love those pans. They are made the old way without any roughness whatsoever. When I got them I stripped them down and reseasoned them. I hope I will be able to pass them down to my daughter.

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