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Old 10-04-2007, 06:55 PM   #1
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Everyday pans

Can someone explain what an everyday pan is to me? Why don't they have the typical long handle? What makes one pan an everyday pan and another not?

Here's my situation; I'm looking for a more "convenient" pan to use on the stovetop. I love my Cuisinart fry pans and saute pan, but I can't believe the difference between the 10" and 12" in size. By the time you take into account the extra long handle and the helper handle... I can't even lay the 12" pans flat in my sink. Which makes them a pan I do not want to use "everyday". They have become more specialized. Plus sometimes they just seem to big for the food I'm cooking, but the 10" seems too small. (OK fine, call me Goldilocks looking for a pan that's "just right" ) Not to mention I think I would like the pan that I use most often to have a non-stick surface. I do have a 10" fry pan that is non-stick, but it really isn't large enough to cook anything in other than a couple eggs. Certainly not anything I could cook bacon or/and ham in, slide that out of the way, then drop in a couple of eggs. Maybe I need a griddle for that, though....

I want a pan with sides higher than a fry pan, non-stick, a handle so I can shake it and lift it off the stove with one hand, a lid would be nice, oh, and yeah... I could use everyday.

Does such a pan exist?
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Old 10-04-2007, 07:05 PM   #2
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Maybe I need a griddle for that, though.....
Hmmmm. I see nasty Mr. Rationalization at work here.


Don't know, pacanis, but I do share your dilemma about how pans fit on the stovetop or in the sink for cleaning. I just usually suck it up and muddle through.
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Old 10-04-2007, 08:09 PM   #3
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Ackkk, when will I learn?
My response just got eaten
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Old 10-04-2007, 08:13 PM   #4
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OK...... let's try again

My perfect pan would be thick aluminum, non-stick, have a lid, flat bottom about 10-1/2 inches across, flared/curved sides (like a wok) about 3 inches high, one handle on one side (no helper handle)
Oh, and dishwasher safe
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Old 10-04-2007, 08:14 PM   #5
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There are options.

In skillets, there is usually nothing between 10" and a 12" sizes. If ones too small then the other is you best choice.

Alternatively, consider a saute or fry pan, which is a straight sided, flat bottomed alternatlive. A 10" saute pan willhold more because of the flat bottom and np sloping sides.

An everyday pan is a skillet with no long handle. Capacity issues would be the same as for the skillets.

My 12" skillet won't fit flat in my sink but I still can clean it.
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Old 10-04-2007, 08:22 PM   #6
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OK...... let's try again

My perfect pan would be thick aluminum, non-stick, have a lid, flat bottom about 10-1/2 inches across, flared/curved sides (like a wok) about 3 inches high, one handle on one side (no helper handle)
Oh, and dishwasher safe
Okay, now you're talkin'. Now that you've identified what you want, all you have to do is to manufacture one and market it. I'll bet there are others who share your need. See, you'd get the pan you want and make a few bucks, too. Well, maybe make some dough if there was enough demand. But, someone's always trying to build a better mousetrap.
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Old 10-05-2007, 10:11 AM   #7
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OK...... let's try again

My perfect pan would be thick aluminum, non-stick, have a lid, flat bottom about 10-1/2 inches across, flared/curved sides (like a wok) about 3 inches high, one handle on one side (no helper handle)
Oh, and dishwasher safe

That's a tough one.

Here's one that's close but it's 12".

Amazon.com: Anolon Advanced Ultimate 12-Inch Covered Stir-Fry Pan: Kitchen & Dining

another close one but has helper handle.

Amazon.com: Calphalon One Nonstick 11-Inch Chef's Skillet with Glass Lid: Kitchen & Dining

Here is one that's dishwasher safe but is 12" and no lid but you can order a lid from potsandpans.com I really like this one.

Amazon.com: Anolon Titanium Non Stick Dishwasher Safe 12-Inch Open Stir Fry Pan with Helper Handle: Kitchen & Dining
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Old 10-05-2007, 10:30 AM   #8
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Thanks for the help, Ron.
I've been cruising Amazon this morning and this was the closest I could find.... in basic shape anyway Amazon.com: Joyce Chen J22-0030 Pro Chef 12 Inch Peking PanŽ with ExcaliburŽ Non-stick coating: Home & Garden
I like your first one. Do you have any experience with this brand?
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Old 10-05-2007, 12:10 PM   #9
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OK...... let's try again

My perfect pan would be thick aluminum, non-stick, have a lid, flat bottom about 10-1/2 inches across, flared/curved sides (like a wok) about 3 inches high, one handle on one side (no helper handle)
Oh, and dishwasher safe
I have a relatively cheap (Simply Calphalon - I think it was about $30) pan that is called a "chicken fryer" which fits most of your requirements. The bottom may be slightly smaller than your spec, and it isn't really "thick" aluminum, but it has worked for me for a number of dishes that standard fry/saute pans just don't. It is about 3" deep with sloping sides and is 12" at the top, with a cover (it does have a helper handle... sorry). I haven't yet used it for frying chicken... but it makes a good substitute for a stovetop wok, it works fine on my flat top electric range, and the nonstick seems to be pretty good. It's a year old now and still looks like new. I don't put it in the dishwasher, however. I just don t do that with ANY of my nonstick cookware.

BTW, I don't think I own a frying pan of any type that will sit flat in my sink. Just out of curiosity, why would that be necessary?
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Old 10-05-2007, 01:01 PM   #10
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HERE YA GO!



Die-cast aluminium, 11 inches in diameter, non-stick coated interior, and the wooden handle, I believe, can be removed.
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Old 10-05-2007, 03:45 PM   #11
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Hey, that's a good one too, Caine. I think that first link of Ron's is the one I'll order though.

Sometimes I need to soak a pan, Rick. I would rather let it soak in the bottom of my sink rather than on my countertop. Or I'll nest that's night's dinnerware in the sink and rinse it off later for the dishwasher (or on a rare occassion, wash it). Those big pans with their extra long handles and helper handle just don't quite cut it in this respect. I've got a fairly large and deep sink, too.
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Old 10-05-2007, 04:42 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by pacanis View Post
Can someone explain what an everyday pan is to me? Why don't they have the typical long handle? What makes one pan an everyday pan and another not?

Here's my situation; I'm looking for a more "convenient" pan to use on the stovetop. I love my Cuisinart fry pans and saute pan, but I can't believe the difference between the 10" and 12" in size. By the time you take into account the extra long handle and the helper handle... I can't even lay the 12" pans flat in my sink. Which makes them a pan I do not want to use "everyday". They have become more specialized. Plus sometimes they just seem to big for the food I'm cooking, but the 10" seems too small. (OK fine, call me Goldilocks looking for a pan that's "just right" ) Not to mention I think I would like the pan that I use most often to have a non-stick surface. I do have a 10" fry pan that is non-stick, but it really isn't large enough to cook anything in other than a couple eggs. Certainly not anything I could cook bacon or/and ham in, slide that out of the way, then drop in a couple of eggs. Maybe I need a griddle for that, though....

I want a pan with sides higher than a fry pan, non-stick, a handle so I can shake it and lift it off the stove with one hand, a lid would be nice, oh, and yeah... I could use everyday.

Does such a pan exist?
You're looking for what used to be called a Chicken Fryer.. A skillet with high walls and a lid.... They do exist, but can be hard to find. The best ones are found at thrift/used stores. Magnalite made a great one!!
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Old 10-06-2007, 06:59 AM   #13
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Someone else mentioned chicken fryer.
What makes one pan a chicken fryer and another a saute pan? I cook my fried chicken in a pan called a saute pan..... I brown it with the lid off, turn down the heat and put the lid on, then the lid comes off again to crisp it up. What have I been missing?
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Old 10-07-2007, 07:53 PM   #14
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Can someone explain what an everyday pan is to me? Why don't they have the typical long handle? What makes one pan an everyday pan and another not?
An everyday pan is basically a 12-14 inch chicken fryer with two helper/pot handles instead of a long skillet handle amd usually has a lid. A chicken fryer is basically a 12-14 inch saute pan (straight sided) but deeper amd doesn't have a lid. A fry pan is a skillet with sloping sides, but generally not as deep as a saute pan (although some are depending on brand) amd usually have a lid that is interchangeable with the 5-6 qt pot.

An omlet pan is like a fry pan except the sides are not as deep (depending on brand some are only 1/2-1 inch high) and the bottom and side are a little different - a fry pan has a definate demarcation line between the bottom and side - the omlet pan has a gentle slope from the bottom up the side without a definate line between the two.

The difference between a 4-qt sauce pan and a 4-qt sauce pot is the handles - the sauce pan has a long handle, like a skillet, and the pot has two pot/helper like handles. And the pot may have a higher side to bottom ratio than the pan.

Different manufacturers take liberties with what they call things. For example - the Dutch Oven. A Dutch Oven is made of cast iron, has 3 short legs, and a flat top with a rim around it that helps keep coals from sliding off. A 5-6 qt SS pot is NOT a Dutch Oven - it's a pot. Le Cruset does NOT make Dutch Ovens, nor does anyone else who makes enameled cast iron pots - they are FRENCH Ovens.

Quote:
Originally Posted by pacanis
I cook my fried chicken in a pan called a saute pan..... I brown it with the lid off, turn down the heat and put the lid on, then the lid comes off again to crisp it up. What have I been missing?
When you reduce the temp below frying temp and put on the lid ... your chicken begins to absorb grease and begins to steam rather than fry. Keep the temp up, and forget the lid ... and you won't have to "crisp it up again", and it will not be as greasy.
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Old 10-08-2007, 08:10 AM   #15
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Thanks for the help, Ron.
I've been cruising Amazon this morning and this was the closest I could find.... in basic shape anyway Amazon.com: Joyce Chen J22-0030 Pro Chef 12 Inch Peking PanŽ with ExcaliburŽ Non-stick coating: Home & Garden
I like your first one. Do you have any experience with this brand?
The Joyce Chen is high carbon steel, not anodized aluminum.

Most of my cookware is Anolon Titanium and Advanced so my answer is yes, I have experience with that brand and highly recommend it.
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Old 10-08-2007, 09:50 AM   #16
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Nice explanation, Michael.
Maybe I'll give frying chicken a different way a try, soo. The recipe is out of a Better Homes cookbook and it comes out perfect every time, so I hate to change it, but the way you explain it it probably isn't the healthiest.... not if the chicken is absorbing flavor... errr, I mean grease back into it .

Ron, I ordered that first pan you posted the link on last night. It's good to hear an endorsment.
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Old 10-10-2007, 01:16 PM   #17
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That didn't take long. I think it will work for me.
The bottom flat area is only 6-1/4", due to it being "wok style", but the sides slope of gradually so it should work. It fits flat in my sink in case I need to soak it, too which is good because it's not dishwasher safe. For some reason it's oven safe to 375F though....
I can't wait to try it out on a few things that my other pans just don't seem to "fit" what I'm cooking. It seems very well made with a tight fitting lid and comfortable handle.
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Old 10-10-2007, 03:14 PM   #18
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It's a non-stick pan. You should never have to soak it unless you REALLY screw up!
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Old 10-10-2007, 03:45 PM   #19
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It's a non-stick pan. You should never have to soak it unless you REALLY screw up!
But it's good that it fits in your sink just in case - ask me how I know!
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Old 10-17-2007, 01:21 PM   #20
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Just an update. I'm liking my new pan
Here's my impromptu quicky lunch. Something that previously I didn't have that "just right" pan or pot for.
Heat up some olive oil, cut up some frozen dogs and throw them in, then onions, then bacon (sometimes I start with the bacon as that is very often in the freezer, too), then add your favorite flavor Bush's beans after things get going good. Pour some over a couple slices of bread and maybe squirt on a little catsup and that'll hold you until a late dinner I like this new pan because it's inbetween a fry pan and a pot. Thanks again for the link, Ron.

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