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Old 02-05-2008, 07:53 PM   #41
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copper pots

Does anyone know if JC Penney brand of copper pots are of a good quality? It is the Cooks brand and is suppossed to have a lifetime warranty.
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Old 11-13-2008, 07:22 AM   #42
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Hi All

Please bear with me on this this is my first post to any kind of forum, I am looking to buy some copper pans and have come across 2 sets with in my price range which are the Baumalu (2 mm wall thickness) set and Ethos 5 piece copper pan set with mirror steel lids (Tri ply pan set).
Can any one say which is the best ?
Also are the Tri ply pans as good as the straight copper one?
Or can you recommend any other makes?

Thank you
Mykool
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Old 11-13-2008, 09:47 AM   #43
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I'm a pan junkie. Copper has great cooking qualities...quick to heat quick to cool great control etc. That said, it is heavy, requires polishing and if tin lined it takes a bit more care than most people care to give it. Tri ply means 3 layers sandwiched together, the middle layer being copper or aluminum for heat conduction, the outer layers being SS for easy care and non reactive cooking. THey have proven themselves to be decent and long lasting. What do want? The look and work of copper or the easy of care for the triply?
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Old 12-16-2008, 10:02 AM   #44
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I purchased 5 pots on Saturday. A frying pan with lid, sauté pan, and 3 various sizes of sauce pans. Total came to $227.00. I was ecstatic with my purchase. It appears that 2 of the sauce pans do not have lips, and therefore I do believe that I could get lids for them. I (along with the sales reps at William-Sonoma) got tire of my nose pressed up against the glass looking at the $1800.00 sets. I had check several Marshall’s at various times, and stumbled into one in a town that I visit very rarely. My son was the one that pointed them out and said get them now. Does anyone know if it is difficult to get the lids for these pots? I have one copper pot that I bought myself, and wrapped it from my boys last Christmas. I like it very much, but it is a 3qt pan. I am not concerned with the removing the lacquer. I can do that easily. I have been using Magnetite Professionals. They were a wedding gift from some friends. My wife does not cook. I have several Cast Iron Pots, one Cast Iron in Enamel, and a couple of woks. I took my time going to college, and worked in an excellent Chinese restaurant for a couple of years, and also a Mexican Restaurant for a couple of years. Any info on getting the lids would be appreciated. In pot is 6 3/8th inches across, one is 7 1/8th, and the pot with the lip is 8 ˝ inches across.
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Old 01-26-2009, 07:17 PM   #45
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Hi Copper Pan fans;

'first post here - thanks to everyone for all the incredible detail - which I read AFTER making an impulsive buy of two, 2mm thick, saucepans/pots from TJMaxx at the w/end. something told me I got them for a 'steal' at $34 and $39 respectively (though neither had lids!). 'Thought I'd do a quick Google check on pan 'preparation' and this forum popped up with WAY more anecdotal info than anywhere else!

'Had another quick look around Marshalls, Home Goods and Tuesday Morning with mixed results (TM had 1mm thick pans, FOUR times the price of elsewhere!) but lucked out with a nice sautee pan for $60, with a lid.

None of them appeared to have had laquer on the outside ('didn't fancy the 'chemical' approach so boiled water gently for 20 mins in each, with NO laquer-drip/peel). 'Spent Sunday luxuriating in fine sauce, gravy and sautee-ing activities ... a definite improvement in flavor retention - possibly because of the VERY considerably lower flames (gas) at which the pans very evenly cooked the food.

ONE of the pans has a 'hammered' finish (echoed by the tinning on the inside), the other two are smooth - all have the 'made in France' logo stamped. 'Was a bit wary of anything marked "Made In China" - also ANYthing with a celebrity chef's name on it - pure marketing ... as several of that variety were (aside from being at least twice or thrice the price - that's THREE 'ices'!) only 1 mm thick and had 'plastic' handles instead of the super strong/heavy/long cast iron ones which allow two hands for lifting if needed - a great idea.

Does anyone know where appropriate copper pan lids can be bought (on their own) so I can cover my 'lid-less' two?

Thanks again to all for the invaluable 'copper' wisdom.

Jon
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Old 01-29-2009, 01:19 PM   #46
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Depending on whether you want the lids that would have come on the pans, or just workable lids, there are any number of options. Assuming Balmalu, the lids are available, and will probably cost as much as you paid for the pans. Mauvil lids should also fit at a higher price. Alternatives include Pyrex and the universal style lids that will fit different sizes of pans. It is not unsual for saucepans to come without lids. At $35/pot for 2mm copper w/cast iron handles, I would think that you got a good deal. Ebay also has lids occassionally available. A Google or ebay search should turn up what you want.
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Old 07-04-2009, 01:38 AM   #47
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Acetone/Nail Polish Remover is ok?

Wow.. this has been a most informative thread!
Like a couple others.. I had been debating on trying a copper pot/pan and came across the baumalu line a few times at the local TJ Maxx stores.
Today I broke down and picked up the small sauce pot with lid for $13.. thought this would be a good simple way to try copper with sauces.

My question is this.. removing the lacquer.. someone mentioned acetone and using fingernail polish remover.. it is acetone.. could I use this to remove the lacquer coating or are there other compounds in the acetone that would be detrimental to the copper?

Thanks so much!
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Old 07-20-2009, 06:27 AM   #48
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Baumalu copper cookware

Baumalu produces excellent-quality tin-lined copper pans in the traditional fashion with hand-hammered exteriors, hand-riveted cast-iron handles and a wide selection of cookware for every purpose. Given the huge rises in the price of copper over the last two years, Baumalu remains one of the most cost-effective sources of traditional cookware. You can buy from eBay direct from France. The company is based in Alsace in north-eastern France and was founded in 1971.

I know of people who still cook in copper pans made over 100 years ago (OK - with some retinning) and they really do last a lifetime. The tin linings are important because the tin conducts heat some seven times more efficiently than steel, allowing fantastic temperature control, and of course energy efficiency.

Hope this helps!
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Old 07-20-2009, 06:34 AM   #49
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Removing lacquer from new copper pans

New copper cookware is always coated in a lacquer film that you need to remove before use. Acetone is perfect for this - just rub a little using a soft cloth into the surface and it will come off very easily. Never use anything abrasive because copper is a soft metal and scratches easily.

Once you start using the pans, you'll find a little lemon juice with some coarse salt rubbed in keeps the pans in shiny condition.

Good luck - hopet his helps.
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Old 07-22-2009, 02:24 PM   #50
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Quote:
Originally Posted by french-only View Post
New copper cookware is always coated in a lacquer film that you need to remove before use. Acetone is perfect for this - just rub a little using a soft cloth into the surface and it will come off very easily. Never use anything abrasive because copper is a soft metal and scratches easily.

Once you start using the pans, you'll find a little lemon juice with some coarse salt rubbed in keeps the pans in shiny condition.

Good luck - hopet his helps.

Thanks a lot. Your explanation & tips certainly did help.
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