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Old 09-28-2007, 03:21 PM   #11
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Michael, wouldn't there be anodized alum under the non-stick coating? If so, that would eliminate the need to season.
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Old 09-28-2007, 03:57 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
Michael, wouldn't there be anodized alum under the non-stick coating? If so, that would eliminate the need to season.
That is exactly what I was thinking! Nice!

Iím wondering what is under the non-stick coating. Anodized aluminum is aluminum that has gone through an electrical/chemical treatment process. By submerging the aluminum in acetone and passing a current through it, the aluminum oxides (what is called rust for other metals). The oxidized layer is hard and non-porous, thus it canít be seasoned.

However, this oxide layer is only so thick, and it can be scratched off. Below the oxide layer is regular aluminum. The question then becomes, what kind of aluminum? Is it sheet or cast? If it is sheet aluminum, then it is non-porous and canít be seasoned. If it is cast aluminum. Then it IS porous and you can season it.

Iím wondering if they (Calphalon) oxidized the whole pan first, and then applied the non-stick coating.....or did they apply the non-stick coating and then oxidize the remaining surfaces? If it is the latter, then there is untreated aluminum under the non-stick coating.

Also, Iím wondering what is wrong with the current non-stick coating? She says itís sticking. Has the non-stick layer peeled away in the area where it sticks, or has it become stained there? In some cases, a PTFE surface (non-0stick surface) can develop stains that stick, but those stains can be removed by boiling a mixture of water and bleach in the cookware. Iíd be interested to no more about the damage weíre talking about here.
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Old 09-28-2007, 05:58 PM   #13
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Also, Iím wondering what is wrong with the current non-stick coating? She says itís sticking. Has the non-stick layer peeled away in the area where it sticks, or has it become stained there? In some cases, a PTFE surface (non-0stick surface) can develop stains that stick, but those stains can be removed by boiling a mixture of water and bleach in the cookware. Iíd be interested to no more about the damage weíre talking about here.
Nope, the coating hasn't peeled away but as per your suggestion, I'm boiling clorox & water as we speak. Thanks, Keltin.
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Old 09-28-2007, 06:04 PM   #14
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Nope, the coating hasn't peeled away but as per your suggestion, I'm boiling clorox & water as we speak. Thanks, Keltin.
You may also have to scrub a bit (with a soft cloth rag)....but if the coating has "dried up", then this won't help. Still, it's worth a shot. If this doesn't work, trying seasoning that spot to see what happens. Before a first use, T-FAL recommends seasoning all of their non-stick cookware for some reason!

Rub some oil on the spot, heat it up till the oil shimmers, remove from heat and rub the oil in with a rag (donít burn yourself!). Apply more oil as need to make it look wet and shiny. Let it sit, and if the coating has "dried upĒ maybe this will ďmoisturizeĒ it? Canít say either way....but T-FAL does suggest seasoning their non-stick surfaces, so who knows.
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Old 09-28-2007, 07:42 PM   #15
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Hi Everyone!

Nonstick coating begins to outgas at high temperatures. Who know what that does to people, but it can kill pet birds. Plus, there's the coating that might be getting into your food. So, just as habit, I never use nonstick cookware over anything higher than a low to medium low flame. And, I never buy high-end nonstick cookware since the coating isn't all that durable and often doesn't last that long. I buy my nonstick skillets from a restaurant supply store - they're pretty cheap and have this great slick nonsick coating that nothing sticks to - and I replace it as soon as it shows any sign of wear.

So, if the manufacturer won't replace your pan, you might want to check out a restaurant supply store to see what they have..

Good luck!
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Old 09-28-2007, 08:17 PM   #16
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And, I never buy high-end nonstick cookware since the coating isn't all that durable and often doesn't last that long.
I find the opposite to be true. I have Calphalon non stick pans. They are about 5 or 6 years old and have been used often. The coating is still almost as non tick as the day I got them. One of them ever has a large deep scratch that had been there almost as long as I have had the pan. The coating has never chipped off from the scratch and food does not stick to it. These pans are much heavier than the inexpensive kinds you can get so hot spots and uneven cooking is not as much of an issue.
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Old 09-28-2007, 08:43 PM   #17
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It is like there is burned on, to the point of fused on, stains, Keltin. I was laughing as I read "you might have to scrub a bit". As bad as I am at cooking, I'm a scrubber. Cleaning, reviving, restoring - that's my forte. But I can't get this stuff all the way off. And it's hard to see it because the non-stick is black, too. (I tried to get a pic for you but couldn't get one detailed enough to show it.)

I haven't pulled out the big guns yet, only nylon type scrubbers and barkeepers friend and now the boiling clorox water, because I know tougher stuff runs the risk of damaging the non-stick. But since it's NOT non-stick anymore, I'm going to go for it. I'll let you guys know if I hit on the right combination of things to fix it. And thanks again for all your help and suggestions.

It's funny, I don't even use non-stick anymore. My first foray into better cookware was a few pieces of Calphalon non-stick, including this griddle. Then I read a review of Calphalon SS tri-ply so I bought 1 sauce pan on sale and became a convert. For me, it's easier to see what the food is doing and somehow I don't burn stuff as badly and foods never burn on. Now I have all SS cookware but my 15 y.o. son only likes to cook with the non-stick and it works wonderfully for him. So the 4 pieces of non-stick are his. Unfortunately, I had screwed up this griddle before they all became his territory, which he reminds me of on a regular basis.
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Old 09-29-2007, 08:47 PM   #18
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Where to start ....

MaryE: Yes, overheating nonstick cookware can emit vapors that are lethal to birds and can sometimes cause flu like symptoms in some humans - ever hear of "Teflon Flu"? Did you notice that I emphasized the need for good ventilation??? Oh, and don't worry if you eat some nonstick coating - your body can not break it down or digest anything from it ... it will just pass right on through.

Andy M: No - aluminum doesn't have to be "seasoned". However, when seasoned like cast iron it develops the nonstick characteristics of cast iron.

Keltin and Andy M: I would guess that the surface under the nonstick coating is anodized. I had a summer job back in 1964/5 when I was in high school working for Southern Anodizing and this is the process we used:

The raw aluminum parts first went into a hot degreaser tank (don't remember the exact temp but it was hot enough the solution vaporized - but due to it's density it didn't rise up above the top of the tank). After that there was a dip in a hot rinse tank, then into the sulphuric acid tank where the anodizing took place - a tank where a DC (direct) electrical current went through it - a grid on the bottom of the tank was hooked to the cathode (negative) and the aluminum parts connected to the anode (positive) charge. Then it went in a neutralizer solution and wash - then into a dye tank, and into another rinse tank. Some parts then went to another area where the interior was coated with nylon or Teflon.

I saw an episode on "How It's Made" that looked like Calphalon was following the same process.

Now some other random thoughts:

1) Nonstick coatings are polymers. Oil/fat, when heated (like in seasoning a cast iron skillet) polymerizes ... and becomes a fused polymer layer - thus it's nonstick like properties. Hummm ... a non-toxic renewable nonstick surface!

2) It may not be possible to remove/seperate something that gets fused to a nonstick surface because of overheating because they may have become chemically bonded to one another. Ever put some leftover tomato sauce (containing oil/fat of some sort) on a plastic container and it stained it ... and nothing you tried would remove either the color or the greasy feeling? That's not a problem with some plastics, like polycarbonate, but some are chemical first-cousins of oil and when put together they bond to each other - even without heat.

3) A seasoned cast iron skillet can handle temps in the 600+-F range without damage although they may smoke like crazy (I'm thinking about my experience making blackened redfish) - nonstick surfaces can only handle about 450-500 F, and not direct high heat like under a broiler. That's why I thought a run through a self-cleaning cycle might work (about 900-F) wjich will turn the oil/fat seasoning on cast iron to ash.

SHAZAM! A THOUGHT!!!!!

IF the material is not chemically fused to the surface - maybe what I use to remove burned on grease from the bottom of my hard anodized skillets will work ... Murphy's Oil Soap and a green scrubby - this stuff can remove the varnish from cabinets, especially if you don't dilute it! Don't know why I didn't think about this before ... maybe it was too obvious or too simple of a possible solution???
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