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Old 09-27-2007, 09:23 PM   #1
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Hard anodized fry pan sticking now

Just joined the forum, and had a question about a pan.

I have the Kirkland series hard anodized pans, all of them are fine except one. It was fine until about 4 months ago. I have had the set for about 6 years.

this one pan started getting a white chalky film on the inside surface. it would not wash out. We only wash by hand. Now, i have had a bad run of food sticking right in the middle of the pan.

I am worried that the pan has lost something important that makes it non stick.

Is the surface of the hard anodize pan a lifelong surface that can be restored? Or, is it possible to over heat the pan or cook off part of the non stick coating?

Thanks in advance for your responses.

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Old 09-27-2007, 09:33 PM   #2
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I'm sorry you're experiencing problems with your cookware, mayres. I'm not familiar with anodized cookware, so I can't offer an opinion or solution. However, there are plenty of knowledgeable members here who will be around to help. Just be patient. The answers will come.

Welcome to DC.
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Old 09-27-2007, 11:33 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mayres
Is the surface of the hard anodize pan a lifelong surface that can be restored? Or, is it possible to over heat the pan or cook off part of the non stick coating?
If it is coated with a non-stick surface then yes, you can over heat it and ruin the surface.

I don't know what the warranty is on Kirkland cookware but you might check with the store where you purchased it for assistance if you didn't save that warranty card that came with it that tells you how to handle a problem like this.
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Old 09-28-2007, 01:10 AM   #4
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Originally Posted by Michael in FtW View Post
If it is coated with a non-stick surface then yes, you can over heat it and ruin the surface.

I don't know what the warranty is on Kirkland cookware but you might check with the store where you purchased it for assistance if you didn't save that warranty card that came with it that tells you how to handle a problem like this.
Michael, I think I've ruined a non-stick griddle, too. Is there a way to "revive" the non-stick or even simply to remove it and use it without? It's heavy anodized aluminum with non-stick coating. It's Calphalon, which I know is supposed to have a lifetime warranty, but I'm pretty sure I overheated it (before I came to DC and learned better ) so I know it wasn't a defect in manufacturing. Anyway, I have just assumed it's a total loss but when I saw your post, I thought I might check. TIA
Terry
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Old 09-28-2007, 02:03 AM   #5
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Michael always gives great adivce.

Hard anodized cookware is made from aluminum which has had the outside metal anodized. The anodizing process helps protect agains both corrosion (yes, aluminum does corrode) and scratching. The inside of the cookware is usually coated with either a silverstone or teflon plastic coating that can be dammaged by excessive heat. Once it is dammaged, it can not be restored.

Follow Michael's advice and check you warranty. If you can not get the items replaced, I recomend replacement with cast-iron. When seasoned properly, it is as slippery as teflon, and can be repaired by simply reseasoning if need be. it's also much cheaper and will last a lifetime or two.

There are also some cookware that claims to use a combination of ceramic and titanium top provide a virtually indistructable non-stick cooking surface that can withstand any heat you might throw at it.

There are also claims made that nonstick made with diamond and teflon that are fused to the pan are nearly indestructable, but still require care to not overheat them. Now I do know that diamond is an excellent heat conductor, and is very hard. Don't know much about this cookware though.

Google search these items and look for performance reviews on them.

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Old 09-28-2007, 02:47 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fisher's Mom
Michael, I think I've ruined a non-stick griddle, too. Is there a way to "revive" the non-stick or even simply to remove it and use it without?
Terry - try to take it back and exchange it, if you can - swear to the clerk you only heated it to medium or med-high like the instructions said. Unfortunately, there is no way you can restore the non-stick surface coating.

There might be a way to rescue it to some degree .... is it just a griddle or is it a grill pan on one side and a griddle on the other?
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Old 09-28-2007, 12:13 PM   #7
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It's a flat double griddle (fits over 2 burners) that is one-sided. Anodized on the bottom and non-stick on the cooking surface.
Terry
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Old 09-28-2007, 03:01 PM   #8
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a hard anodized pan has been treated inside and out, and can be scrathced and pitted by auto dishwashers, and made sticky by not cleaning thoroughly, but that's about it. oh and thermal shock (hotpan into cold water)

Most store brands, and many "chef" brands are non stick coated. Now we have a different issue, and yes the coating can wear out or be damaged.
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Old 09-28-2007, 03:05 PM   #9
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You should contact Consumer Relations at Calphalon and see what they have to say before you try what I am about to suggest.

Now, if you have decided that you simply can't use it the way it is and you're ready to toss it out anyway and don't care if you ruin it ....

You might simply try sanding the nonstick surface off.

- or -

I HAVE NOT TRIED THIS WITH NONSTICK COOKWARE - but I have used this method to remove baked on grease on cast iron and hard anodized aluminum. Since the nonstick material is ruined by high heat, and it all has a temp limit of 450-500F, I'm thinking this might work:

OPEN THE WINDOWS AND TURN ON THE FANS - YOU MUST KEEP THE PLACE WELL VENTILATED DURING THIS PROCESS. Place it on the center rack in your oven and run it through a "self-cleaning" cycle. If this works it should either cause the nonstick surface to flake off, or convert it to ash.


Once you've removed the nonstick material you can then season it like cast iron ... and over time it will develop the nonstick properties of well seasoned cast iron. Or, you can just use it as is.


If you try this - let me know how it turns out!
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Old 09-28-2007, 03:16 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by Michael in FtW View Post
You should contact Consumer Relations at Calphalon and see what they have to say before you try what I am about to suggest.

Now, if you have decided that you simply can't use it the way it is and you're ready to toss it out anyway and don't care if you ruin it ....

You might simply try sanding the nonstick surface off.

- or -

I HAVE NOT TRIED THIS WITH NONSTICK COOKWARE - but I have used this method to remove baked on grease on cast iron and hard anodized aluminum. Since the nonstick material is ruined by high heat, and it all has a temp limit of 450-500F, I'm thinking this might work:

OPEN THE WINDOWS AND TURN ON THE FANS - YOU MUST KEEP THE PLACE WELL VENTILATED DURING THIS PROCESS. Place it on the center rack in your oven and run it through a "self-cleaning" cycle. If this works it should either cause the nonstick surface to flake off, or convert it to ash.


Once you've removed the nonstick material you can then season it like cast iron ... and over time it will develop the nonstick properties of well seasoned cast iron. Or, you can just use it as is.


If you try this - let me know how it turns out!
That's kinda what I was thinking of doing but thought I'd get other thoughts, too. I was thinking about putting it in the grill outside and really crank it up. I did this to season some cast iron to avoid the smoke factor and it worked well. Don't have a self-cleaning cycle on the oven so I think I can get as much heat from the grill as the oven. I was thinking, as you theorized, that it might incinerated the bulk of the non-stick coating and then I could sand off any remaining bits. Thanks for letting me know that you can season aluminum. I didn't know if that would work but as is, I'm not using it anymore because EVERYTHING sticks to it. So I've got nothing to lose. I really couldn't in good conscience try to get Calphalon to replace it since I know I screwed it up with too high heat. I will probably try it this weekend and will let you know how I fare. Pics too, if I can.

Thanks again, guys. It's like having a huge number of relatives I can call up and ask for help!
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