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Old 11-08-2005, 09:23 AM   #31
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Obviously I don't explain myself very well.I was talking about preheating the pan before adding the fat.But if you see no reason do do this,then don't,that's what makes us all different.
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Old 11-08-2005, 12:10 PM   #32
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OIL SMOKE POINT CHART
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Old 11-09-2005, 11:45 AM   #33
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Is the Pan Hot Yet?

Most home cooks do not properly preheat their skillets, which results in a lack of both crust and flavor development. This may be due in part to the advice of high-quality cookware manufacturers, who often suggest preheating a pan with a film of oil over low heat for only one to two minutes. Overheating, they warn, can cause discoloration. We followed their recommendations and were appalled at the sorry state of the food: pale, crustless, and with feeble browning. In our opinion, richly browned foods are worth risking discoloration (which, by the way, is easily removed with a little elbow grease).

How do you know when your skillet is properly preheated? The oil—smoking oil, to be exact—holds the answer. Measured into a cold skillet and heated for a few minutes, oil gives off wisps of smoke that serve as a visual alarm that the skillet is hot and ready. We tested our theory with beef steaks, chicken (skin-on), and fish fillets and steaks. In each case, oil that had just begun to smoke was a good indicator that the skillet was hot enough to produce well-crusted, good-tasting, and good-looking food without overcooking.

That said, not every kind of oil is suitable for high-heat browning and searing. Unrefined oils, such as extra-virgin olive oil, should not be used because their smoke points are low. Refined oils, such as vegetable, canola, corn, and peanut (be careful of the unrefined peanut oil carried in some grocery stores) work well because their smoke points are high (above 400 degrees). A word to the wise: Using just-smoking oil as a heat indicator is good only for browning and searing in very little oil, no more than a couple of tablespoons. Smoking oil is simply too hot for pan-frying and deep-frying.reprinted with permission from cooksillustrated.com
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Old 11-09-2005, 11:56 AM   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gwkr36a
How do you know when your skillet is properly preheated? The oil—smoking oil, to be exact—holds the answer. Measured into a cold skillet and heated for a few minutes, oil gives off wisps of smoke that serve as a visual alarm that the skillet is hot and ready. We tested our theory with beef steaks, chicken (skin-on), and fish fillets and steaks. In each case, oil that had just begun to smoke was a good indicator that the skillet was hot enough to produce well-crusted, good-tasting, and good-looking food without overcooking.
I also thought the sight of a little smoke was a good indicator. The other day when I was doing fajitas with the fajita sizzler (rather new, our second time) I waited until it started smoking, but when I dropped the food onto it the flame flared up on the sizzler momentarily. Although the fajita grilled wonderfully, perectly browned, but this flame issue bothered and scared me a bit. Was the sizzler overheated? Is there any other way to tell the proper temperature on these sort of things? Or flaming is a normal reaction?
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Old 11-09-2005, 12:30 PM   #35
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but when I dropped the food onto it the flame flared up on the sizzler momentarily. Although the fajita grilled wonderfully, perectly browned, but this flame issue bothered and scared me a bit. Was the sizzler overheated? Is there any other way to tell the proper temperature on these sort of things? Or flaming is a normal reaction?[/quote]

When you say "dropped the food on the sizzler" did you cause a spatter that
could have caused the flare up?
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Old 11-09-2005, 02:25 PM   #36
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gwkr36a
When you say "dropped the food on the sizzler" did you cause a spatter that
could have caused the flare up?
No I didn't throw it in, I laid them down reasonably gently, I don't think I splashed the oil outside the sizzler...
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Old 02-02-2007, 05:49 PM   #37
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cooking with stainless steel

Thanks, everyone for replying, I will give the hot idea a try. My wife and I firmly believe in heating our plates for every meal where hot food is served. The meal stays warm longer and is just that much more enjoyable. I do this by putting them in the oven at low heat for a few minutes or if that is in use, I put the plates in the micro for a min. or so. Naturally, the dishes must be able to take the heat. try it and see.
P.S., I went to my doctor the other day and told him that it seems nobody is paying any attention to me. And he said NEXT.
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Old 02-02-2007, 06:18 PM   #38
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chuck shuck
I put the plates in the micro for a min. or so.
Make sure you put a cup of water in there too at the same time (or something else with liquid) otherwise you run the risk of doing serious damage to your microwave and possibly even starting a fire.
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