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Old 10-27-2008, 10:51 PM   #1
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Ideal Cooking Ware?

I am starting to hate my non-stick pots. Nothing ever seems to cook. Also I am having pot evny from watching Hell's Kitchen. I was wondering how I can get those neat professional or close to pots and how do I take care of them?
All you see in the store now is non-stick.

I know I could use iron but those pots are so heavy.

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Old 10-27-2008, 10:55 PM   #2
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Go to a kitchen store or two. They will have a much better selection. You can choose from anodized aluminum, tri-ply stainless steel and disk bottom stainless. These are the mainstream choices. There is also copper cookware and cast iron.

Have a good time shopping!
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Old 11-03-2008, 04:03 AM   #3
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Unfortunately there is no such thing as a good light pot.

What you want is:
- Thick materiel in both the walls and bottom. This ensures even distribution of heat.
- For general purpose use you probably want some form of sandwich, with different materials providing different properties.
- Metal handles - avoid any so-called "oven safe" plastics as they never are and you do want pots and pans you can transfer from cook top to the oven.
- Stainless Steel is the most practical interior coating, but it is an uneven distrubutor of heat, so you don't want solid SS.
- I like glass lids the best as they allow you to monitor the cooking without removing the lid.
- Cast Iron is the best at maintaining heat, copper is best for adjusting heat, but both require a significant amount of maintenance and care.

If money was no object I would have for home use:
- Copper clad with Stainless steel lining and glass lids for half a dozen different pots and one sautepan.
- Cast Iron dutch oven, skillets, saucepans and a small saucepan.
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Old 11-03-2008, 08:03 AM   #4
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I would shop your thrift stores, Goodwill & Salvation Arny stores for good deals for the things above.
Instead of spending BIG $$ on stuff you may potentially not like, you get to save and increase your inventory more.
You'd be amazed at what you can find in those places.
Good luck, BurntToast
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Old 11-03-2008, 08:37 AM   #5
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Thanks I will definitely look into the thrift store Idea. And know I know for what I am looking. but will all steel pots and pans I would haveto use oil right? and lots of it? I guess high heat oils like canola or peanut?
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Old 11-03-2008, 08:57 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Burnt_Toast View Post
Thanks I will definitely look into the thrift store Idea. And know I know for what I am looking. but will all steel pots and pans I would haveto use oil right? and lots of it? I guess high heat oils like canola or peanut?

Sort of depends on what you're cooking. Sometimes high heat, sometimes not. Sometimes oil, sometimes not.
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Old 11-03-2008, 10:55 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Burnt_Toast View Post
Thanks I will definitely look into the thrift store Idea. And know I know for what I am looking. but will all steel pots and pans I would haveto use oil right? and lots of it? I guess high heat oils like canola or peanut?
I use olive oil for nearly 99% of all my cooking. I always add a couple tablespoons or so in the pan first but never let it get hot enough to burn or smoke bad. If I'm planing on frying something I'll pick up some peanut oil for that one purpose. Other than that, it's canola oil. Canola is good for high temp sears and it has a mild flavor for things you don't want olive oil in. I also use canola to clean the grill grates.

For meats that give off their own fats like bacon or sausage, I just add a tiny bit of oil to the pan first to kind of get things started.

Clean up is easy using the blue scotchbrite pads and bar keepers friend to get stains out.

Just remember to keep at least one non stick pan for eggs.
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