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Old 08-27-2012, 12:02 PM   #1
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Induction

For induction stovetops a magnet has to be able to stick to the bottom of the pan for it to work.

Of course cast iron and carbon steel. Most stainless steel AllClad pans. Presto brand stainless steel pressure cookers work. I have a nice set of Bourgeat restaurant pans that work and also a set of Tramontina stainless pans that work. And a KitechenAid frying pan.

Does anyone know of any others?

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Old 09-24-2012, 08:11 AM   #2
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I am about to swap from gas to induction when I renovate my kitchen and so I have looked into this question in some detail. Being in Belgium I favour local products and am lucky enough to have two of the greats not so far away (Falk, being copper, will be retired). That leaves at the moment Demeyere who have a huge selection of fiendishly expensive pans that are supposed to be as good as it gets on induction.

If anyone can suggets better I am very keen to hear as I only have a month more to wait before I have to take the plunge into pretty well a complete new set of pans.

Andrew
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Old 09-24-2012, 08:29 AM   #3
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Thanks. I will look into Demeyere, if nothing else just to see how expensive.
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Old 09-24-2012, 08:47 AM   #4
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Debuyer mineral steel and carbon steel pans work very well on our induction range.

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Old 09-24-2012, 08:56 AM   #5
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I love carbon steel pans. Especially after you've used them long enough so they build up that seasoned finish. It's also my favorite metal for kitchen knives, although you really have to look around to find them.
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Old 09-24-2012, 10:35 PM   #6
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I love my Debuyer, just have to make sure the knife and cookware killer doesn't try to wash them.
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Old 09-25-2012, 03:32 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stock Pot View Post
For induction stovetops a magnet has to be able to stick to the bottom of the pan for it to work.

Of course cast iron and carbon steel. Most stainless steel AllClad pans. Presto brand stainless steel pressure cookers work. I have a nice set of Bourgeat restaurant pans that work and also a set of Tramontina stainless pans that work. And a KitechenAid frying pan.

Does anyone know of any others?
Induction stoves do not need the metal to be magnetic. Rather, they do have to have iron content, such as Cast Iron, Enameled Cast Iron, carbon steel, magnetic and non-magnetic stainless steel, and mineral steel.

Induction stoves work by creating a magentic field that expands and collapses through the cooking vessel. Any time, a magnetic field moves through a conductor, it creates an electrical current. Or, if you pass a conductor through a stationary magnetic filed, it creates that same electrical current. This is how generators, dynamos, and magnetos work to create usable electriclal energy. They pass copper wire through a magnetic field as the wires spin.

The reason compper and aluminum pans won't work on an induction stove is that their conductivity is too good. The natural resistance of iron based metals creates heat as an electrical current passes through it. Transformers are used in an induction stove to create the magnetic field that induces eddy currents in the iron-based pan. The resistance of the pan to those eddy currents causes metal to heat. Induction is the property of creating electricity by either passing a conductor through a magnetic field, or a magnetic field through a conductor. Hence the name, induction stove.

You can use non-magnetic stainless steel on an inductive stove just fine.

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Old 09-25-2012, 03:51 PM   #8
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Not on my Burton counter top unit, or on my Electrolux range. If the metal is not magnetic they shut themselves off.
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Old 09-25-2012, 04:51 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North View Post
Induction stoves do not need the metal to be magnetic.
The burner is the equivalent of a copper coil of in an electric motor. The magnetic field is rapidly alternated between positive and negative reversing polarity of the electric current. When a ferrous metal pan comes in contact with the coil (put the pan on the burner) the molecules in the steel become excited by the rapidly changing current which generates heat.

The bottom of the pan must be constructed of ferrous metal for this process to occur. This why plastic, copper, or ceramic will not work on an induction burner.

Magnets will only stick to ferrous metal, thus this is the ultimate test of functionality of a pan on induction burners.

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Old 09-25-2012, 05:09 PM   #10
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Just guessing. Is it possible that non-magnetic stainless steel doesn't have enough of an iron content to make the induction work?
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