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Old 02-26-2012, 07:20 PM   #21
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Cast iron is a good idea. I have an 8-inch and a 12-inch and I use them all the time. I also have a complete set (from a 1 quart pot through 4 different sizes of frying pan to a 10 quart spaghetti cooker) of tri-ply stainless and a couple of Calphalon anodized aluminium pans but if I had it to do all over again I would do like professional chefs (NOT celebrety chefs!) do and go to a restaurant supply store and buy the cheapest pots and pans they have. If you spend 16 bucks on a 12-inch teflon coated aluminium pan and the teflon starts to deteriorate after 6 months, you don't feel so bad about tossing into the recycle bin and buying a new one.
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Old 02-26-2012, 07:23 PM   #22
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I prefer Calphalon. Cast iron is too heavy for me, and I don't want anything that sticks. Calphalon is guaranteed, so if you get it too hot too many times, and the coating starts flaking off, they will replace it for free.
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Old 02-26-2012, 07:24 PM   #23
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Originally Posted by PrincessFiona60 View Post
I was thinking more like this:
HA! I so want one!

And justplainbill, I've looked into NOMEX gloves, firefighters and military flight crews use them.

They're not exactly cheap but they're pretty sweet!
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Old 02-26-2012, 08:29 PM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Constance
I prefer Calphalon. Cast iron is too heavy for me, and I don't want anything that sticks. Calphalon is guaranteed, so if you get it too hot too many times, and the coating starts flaking off, they will replace it for free.
I love my calphalon, and I also love my cast iron. They both have their place in my kitchen. :)
If you buy cast iron it will still be around when you are gone.
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Old 02-26-2012, 10:29 PM   #25
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Paula Deen's is crappy; in fact, some of it was recalled.

RR is similarly poor quality from the stuff I've seen at Bed Bath and Beyond.
I can't speak for Paula Deen's cookware, but I have to agree about Rachel Ray's. I won an RR Dutch Oven in a raffle three years ago. It looked good and cooked well, but within a year the finish began chipping off. About a year ago it went in the garbage.

I have several pieces of Le Creuset that I absolutely love. The oldest piece is around 30 years old now and, though the finish on the outside is somewhat stained from years of use, it doesn't have a single scuff on the inside. The stuff ain't cheap, though.

I also own a couple of Lodge cast iron pans. They've held up remarkably well. I've even taken them on camping trips!
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Old 02-26-2012, 10:34 PM   #26
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I can't speak for any of them, but how about cast iron skillets as made hundreds of years ago. Mine is exactly like that although I suspect mine is '40s vintage. (My mom gave it to me years ago.)

These years old skillets are made solely out of cast iron, with a cast iron (usually a loop) handle. The only finish or non-stick finish is the iron itself, it's indestructibility. If nothing else you can just blast it all off and reseason it and start anew.
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Old 02-26-2012, 11:35 PM   #27
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I have three Griswold Cast Iron pans, the best you can get. I have the 10 inch, an 8 inch, and a little one, just big enough for two eggs to completely fill. Each of them is well seasoned and so, non-stick. I also have a Wagner 12 inch, and a Lodge 12 inch. The lodge is the heaviest, and so is used for deep fat frying, while the Wagner is used for steaks, chops, fried potatoes, etc. Oh, and I have a Lodge 8 inch that is perfect for making has browns.

I wouldn't trade them for any other kind of pan, period. I also like my stainless pots, and one stainless 12 inch pan used for making crepes. The only teflon I have is a square griddle for making pancakes and folded omelets like yo get from a flat top steel griddle. Otherwise, my 8 inch Griswold makes the half round omelets.

I also have a Lodge, camping dutch oven, that has legs on it. It's great for stews, beans, and braising any kind of meat. I have to put a cookie sheet under it to use it in the oven though, as the legs make it impossible to put on oven grates.

Once seasoned properly, cast iron is nearly stick free. You have to try to make something stick to my pans. Cleanup is super easy. And if anything does stick, hot water and a stiff bristles scrubbing brush cleans it up fast.

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Old 02-27-2012, 01:11 AM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Constance View Post
I prefer Calphalon. Cast iron is too heavy for me, and I don't want anything that sticks. Calphalon is guaranteed, so if you get it too hot too many times, and the coating starts flaking off, they will replace it for free.

If you have gotten to the point where you are burning off/flaking off the Teflon, the smoke you are potentially breathing is pretty bad stuff...like REALLY bad stuff.

Of Course Cast iron is heavy, it's cast iron. And once seasoned, it's non stick. Cast iron will last generations, and more. Like, once humans go extinct, and other beings discover this place, they will see the pyramids, the great wall, and find a bunch of cast iron artifacts.

lodge Cast iron is also guaranteed, but, you have to be doing something pretty silly to screw the pooch with some cast iron.

There is a reason cast iron has a reputation of being a tank, lasting forever, and is passed down through generations. . .it's cast iron. In the right hands, there is nothing that can't be done in cast iron, that can be done in it's off the shelf equivalents.

I am not saying to build ones whole culinary arsenal off of cast iron, but sometimes, less is more, and there is a reason cast iron has been around Long before Rachel Ray, and Paula Deen, and will remain to be around longer than any culinary fad, or TV "Chef" line fad.
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Old 02-27-2012, 06:56 PM   #29
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I own a couple of cast iron skillets, dutch oven, griddles, and a few other things. I also own and use quite a bit of enameled cast iron [Descoware, Cousances, Copco, & Le Creuset].

I don't have a single piece of non stick teflon or its cousin type of stuff in my kitchen. That was not an accident.
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Old 02-27-2012, 06:58 PM   #30
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I'm not very good at seasoning cast iron pans, so I would suggest getting a pre-seasoned cast iron pan made by Lodge.
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