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Old 07-14-2007, 12:44 PM   #11
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I'd have to say "No, a slab of granite will not make a good pizza stone."

Pizza stones not only provide an even heating surface for the pizza, bread, rolls, or whatever else you decide to bake on it (which a slab of granite will surely do), but a pizza stone should also be pourous to absorb mositure, which will create a crisper crust, which granite will definitely not do.
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Old 07-14-2007, 12:50 PM   #12
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Caine makes a good point. Porosity is a key part of the equation.
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Old 07-14-2007, 09:14 PM   #13
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I cook my pizzas on parchment paper directly on the oven rack.

I don't have a pizza stone so I move one of my oven racks to the lowest setting inside the oven, top my pizza and cook it directly on the oven rack on the parchment paper. I have to turn the pizza several times while it's cooking so that it cooks evenly. You can reach into the oven with your bare hands and turn the parchment paper, I don't know why but it doesn't get hot.

I move the pizza to and from the oven with a cookie sheet that doesn't have any sides.



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Old 07-15-2007, 02:23 PM   #14
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Okay. Now I think I'll skip the granite tile as a pizza stone.

Maybe I'll try the parchment paper thing. BettyR, those pizza's look good.
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Old 07-15-2007, 04:01 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KitchenSally
Okay. Now I think I'll skip the granite tile as a pizza stone.

Maybe I'll try the parchment paper thing. BettyR, those pizza's look good.
Thanks; it just so happened that we were having pizza for supper last night so I snapped a quick picture of two of them as they came out of the oven.

For the first pizza I had the oven a little too hot but I cooled it down just a bit to cook the second one.
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Old 08-31-2007, 01:32 AM   #16
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.....I have a slab of granite (remnants of our kitchen remodel) and was wondering if anyone here ever used it as a pizza stone? any advice?
I, too, have just received a slab of 3/4" granite (19" x 13"), courtesy of my new granite countertop contractor. However, his advise about the my intended use of the granite as a baking stone was a resounding "NO". His concern was the high temperature of baking. I've been baking focaccia bread (in cast-iron pans), muffins, roasting chicken (inverted-cone vertical rack), at 375F; which to me is not very high temperature at all!
Since my new oven has a "Bake Stone" mode (factory preset at 400F) I have every intention to modify the focaccia bread dough for pizza, and give the "baking stone" a trial run. What's your take on this? Will the stone crack into hundreds of little pieces?

BTW, has anyone tried using a slab of granite on a gas cooktop?
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Old 08-31-2007, 01:55 AM   #17
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I cook my pizzas on parchment paper directly on the oven rack.

... I have to turn the pizza several times while it's cooking so that it cooks evenly. You can reach into the oven with your bare hands and turn the parchment paper, I don't know why but it doesn't get hot...
With, or without, the baking stone, I would still use the parchment paper for the non-stick properties.
I've baked pizzas in my heavy 12" cast-iron pans with some success; no turning required during the baking period.
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Old 08-31-2007, 09:28 AM   #18
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Obelix,
Bed,Bath&Beyond has a wonderful pizza stone for under $20. Comes with the wooden pizza peel and cutter. http://www.bedbathandbeyond.com/styl..._num=-1&RN=869 It works great. Make sure that you add cornmeal under the dough every time to prevent it from sticking and from other flavors going into your pizza.
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Old 08-31-2007, 09:44 AM   #19
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With, or without, the baking stone, I would still use the parchment paper for the non-stick properties.
I've baked pizzas in my heavy 12" cast-iron pans with some success; no turning required during the baking period.

Actually, parchment paper defeats one of the benefits of a stone. The stone is porous and draws moisture out of the crust, making it crispy. Sprinkling corn meal on the stone/peel serves toprovide a non-stick surface.
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Old 08-31-2007, 10:11 AM   #20
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With, or without, the baking stone, I would still use the parchment paper for the non-stick properties.
I've baked pizzas in my heavy 12" cast-iron pans with some success; no turning required during the baking period.
Parchment paper is a wonderful invention as is cast iron. Cast iron holds heat very well so I could see how it would make a good stand in for a pizza stone.

Pizza sure sounds good; we haven’t had it in a while.

Have you ever cooked plain pizza dough and covered it with chocolate, cinnamon sugar, lemon curd or what ever suits your fancy to make a dessert pizza? They are so beyond good, my family likes the chocolate.

This is the recipe that I use:
Mix together:
1-cup sugar
1/4-cup cornstarch
5 tablespoons cocoa
1/2-tablespoon butter
1/2-teaspoon salt

Stir in 1 cup boiling water and cook over medium heat until thick and bubbly. Remove from heat and add 1/2 stick of butter and 2 teaspoons vanilla.

Microwave instructions:
Mix dry ingredients in a large microwave safe bowl. Heat water to boiling in microwave and add to dry ingredients.

Beat well with a wire whisk then cook for 1 minute on high in microwave and stir well. Cook 1 more minute on high and stir well. Cook in 30-second intervals stirring well after each until topping is thick. Add 1/2 stick butter and 2 teaspoons vanilla and stir well.

Spread on warm pizza dough and sprinkle with powdered sugar.
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