"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Cookware and Accessories > Cookware
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 05-25-2011, 10:51 PM   #21
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,393
It appears your mind is made up on clay cookware. I wish you the best of luck with it.
__________________

__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-26-2011, 08:44 AM   #22
Chief Eating Officer
 
GB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: USA,Massachusetts
Posts: 25,509
I have to ask, do you sell or work for a clay cookware company or somehow benefit from one?
__________________

__________________
You know you can't resist clicking
this link. Your eyes will thank you. VISUAL BLISS
GB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-26-2011, 04:37 PM   #23
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: AK
Posts: 32
no I do not. sahm, its in my intro. btw , real frittatas are supposed to be cooked partially on the stove and then baked in the oven. thats why clay or cast iron is a really good bet.

do I benefit from a clay company - umm, since I have a clay flameware skillet - then yes, I guess I do benefit, no more than someone who loves pyrex and benefits from the product.

also, for a lot of traditional dishes, like tagines and other dishes, do benefit from "traditional" cookware. thats not to say that a couple of metal pots and pans are useful, cuz they are. the best colanders are metal mesh. but some clay and cast irons are also very useful. for example, - the best begian and swedish waffle makers are used on the stovetop and are usually cast iron. they're hinged and have a handle and you flip it over.

the best foods are not not always cooked in 2 minutes. its worth waiting longer for delicious food. for example, couscous, takes 2 hours to make. usually 3 hours. Most delicious tagines, stews, bone broth soups takes hours to make. chili, pot roast, etc.

just my 50 cents.
__________________
Brenna is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-26-2011, 04:59 PM   #24
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,393
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brenna View Post
...the best foods are not not always cooked in 2 minutes. its worth waiting longer for delicious food. for example, couscous, takes 2 hours to make. usually 3 hours. Most delicious tagines, stews, bone broth soups takes hours to make. chili, pot roast, etc.

just my 50 cents.

Your posts seem to suggest clay cookware is the only way to cook food slowly for a long period of time. That's clearly not true.

I cook exclusively in various metal cookware and often cook foods for hours when appropriate. The cook makes delicious food, not the cookware.
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-26-2011, 05:07 PM   #25
Master Chef
 
jennyema's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Boston
Posts: 9,280
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
Your posts seem to suggest clay cookware is the only way to cook food slowly for a long period of time. That's clearly not true.

I cook exclusively in various metal cookware and often cook foods for hours when appropriate. The cook makes delicious food, not the cookware.
But cookware can make cooking easier. Which is why I have an assortment based mostly on fully clad stainless steel,which is probablythe most versatile cookware there is.

I make perfect frittatas in stainless skillets which perform very well on both the stovetop and in the oven. Sometimes I use a CI skillet.

Great stocks come from my SS stockpot. Excellent chili can be made in a large SS saucepan, which can also go into the oven. Most often I'll use a LC french oven for chili, though.

But to each his/her own
__________________
Less is not more. More is more and more is fabulous.
jennyema is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-26-2011, 05:48 PM   #26
Executive Chef
 
Sir_Loin_of_Beef's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Sir Francis Drake Hotel
Posts: 4,888
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brenna View Post
no I do not. sahm, its in my intro. btw , real frittatas are supposed to be cooked partially on the stove and then baked in the oven. thats why clay or cast iron is a really good bet.
Actually, a real fritatta is cooked on top of the stove, then put under the broiler, not baked in the oven. Baked in the oven would be a quiche or a soufflé.

I have fully clad stainless steel pots and pans literally hanging off my walls, and I also own a couple of cast iron skillets and a 5 quart enameled cast iron Dutch oven.



But my current go-to pan is the Calphalon 10-inch non-stick Everyday pan. I also bought a Calphalon 10-inch omelette pan which I use, but not as often as the appropriately named everyday pan. If you check out Amazon.com, they usually have a piece or two of Calphalon hard anodized aluminium pots and pans on sale at all times. I think they're a good investment and plan on adding more of them to my kitchen, one or two at a time.
__________________
Life is much more manageable when thought of as a scavenger hunt as opposed to a surprise party - Jimmy Buffett
Sir_Loin_of_Beef is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-26-2011, 06:15 PM   #27
Executive Chef
 
justplainbill's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Eastern Long Island, New York
Posts: 4,206
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sir_Loin_of_Beef View Post
Actually, a real fritatta is cooked on top of the stove, then put under the broiler, not baked in the oven. Baked in the oven would be a quiche or a soufflé.

I have fully clad stainless steel pots and pans literally hanging off my walls, and I also own a couple of cast iron skillets and a 5 quart enameled cast iron Dutch oven.



But my current go-to pan is the Calphalon 10-inch non-stick Everyday pan. I also bought a Calphalon 10-inch omelette pan which I use, but not as often as the appropriately named everyday pan. If you check out Amazon.com, they usually have a piece or two of Calphalon hard anodized aluminium pots and pans on sale at all times. I think they're a good investment and plan on adding more of them to my kitchen, one or two at a time.
Seem s hard to believe that the Italian fritatta was traditionally made under a broiler.
__________________
justplainbill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2011, 02:51 PM   #28
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: AK
Posts: 32
clay cookware is my preference for "certain type" of cooking, not all. thats is sort of why I was actually asking about ideas for pots and pans. for boiling pasta or veggies or frozen shrimp. that type of stuff. thats what this post was actually about. thank you.

and if anyone here also has a recommendations for like cookie sheets and that type of stuff, NOT teflon, I would LOVE some advice. my teflon started shedding long time ago.

thanx.
__________________
Brenna is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2011, 04:11 PM   #29
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 511
>>boiling pasta or veggies or frozen shrimp.

the cheapest stainless steel pot-of-size will work for that, most excellently.

boiling/steaming is not a demanding task for a pot / pan. or glass, or aluminum or cast iron. I've got a Martha Stewart K-Mart stainless stock pot that does wonders, and will do wonders forever in terms of simmering stock, boiling water and cooking pasta

saute / frying _is_ more demanding of the pan.

the high end stainless / disc / layered/ thirty-ply pots are shooting at the gold standard:

a 3mm thick copper pan with an interior clad stainless lining. well, old style is tin coated, new is stainless.

in terms of fast response and even heat distribution, copper is the way far out and ahead leader. solid silver is better. my checkbook can't afford solid silver pans.
__________________
dcSaute is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-28-2011, 02:53 PM   #30
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: AK
Posts: 32
okay thanx. I was really asking because I have some pots that either are shedding "teflon" or burn too easy and I can't get it off. so thank you so much. this is just the advice I was looking for. thanx.
__________________

__________________
Brenna is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:51 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.