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Old 11-26-2007, 10:39 PM   #11
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Old 11-26-2007, 10:56 PM   #12
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make anything i can just be cooking for me and possible roommate. any recomendations for a beginner cook? on what type?
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Old 11-26-2007, 10:58 PM   #13
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Are you going to be in a dorm with limited cooking appliances or will you be sharing an apartment with a kitchen or other accommodations with cooking privileges?
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Old 11-27-2007, 12:06 AM   #14
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Nobody wants to be responsible for influencing someone to buy an item they may not like or use, hence the reluctant responses. Satisfaction with our cooking gear has as much to do with personal preferences as with quality. That said, I’ll tell you what I got my grown kids when they moved out on their own to get them started. These 4 things would be a good start for someone starting from scratch. Maybe it will give you some ideas.

A small non-stick pan: good for frying eggs or making an omelet or making a grilled cheese sandwich.
Amazon.com: Calphalon Commercial Nonstick 10-Inch International Griddle/Crepe Pan: Kitchen & Dining

A smallish sauce pan with a lid: 1 ½ to 2 ½ qt. size for heating canned goods or cooking all sorts of foods. I like stainless steel but my sons prefer non-stick.
Amazon.com: Calphalon Triply Stainless 2-1/2-Quart Shallow Saucepan with Glass Lid: Kitchen & Dining
Amazon.com: Cuisinart Chef's Classic Stainless 1-1/2-Quart Saucepan with Cover: Kitchen & Dining

A covered sauté pan: You can use this for frying or pan sautéing (duh) or frying in oil. Also, if you get one with oven-safe handles and lid, you can even use it as a “casserole” in the oven.
Amazon.com: Cuisinart Chef's Classic Stainless Cookware 73345-26H a 4 1/2 Saute Pan with Helper Handle and Cover: Kitchen & Dining

A baking sheet: I prefer the commercial bun pans. The half-sheet size fits in your oven, has a thick rolled lip and won't buckle. You can use this for making cookies, frozen pizzas, frozen French fries, and for heating all sorts of frozen prepared foods.
Amazon.com: Half Size Value Sheet Pan 12-7/8" x 17-3/4": Kitchen & Dining

You can substitute the small frying pan and the covered sauté pan with some similar cast iron pans. Cast iron is very inexpensive, and cooks wonderfully. It does require careful care to keep it from rusting and to protect the seasoning so keep that in mind when deciding. I've only included links to show you what type of pans I'm describing. Shop around and see what you like. Good luck and have some fun!
Terry
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Old 11-27-2007, 07:21 AM   #15
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When I first left home, I just got the cheapest stuff in the supermarket as I knew I didn't know enough at that stage about what I wanted/needed. I also was on a very limited budget. My intention was just to bits to survive with and then upgrade when I had the money and the pieces gave up. I just got two non-stick frypans, one small (ideal for scrambled eggs for one size) and one medium (large enough for a fry up or a stirfry for two). I also got a milk saucepan and my mum gave me a couple of old saucepans with lids that she had spare from someone else. Think they were aluminium. One was about 1.5L (good for making a meat sauce for one or two) and the other about 3L (good for pasta and rice). I got a small rectangular pyrex dish, a baking sheet, scone sheet and a loaf pan. Also grabbed a microwave pack which had a couple of plates and bowls in it, as well as a divided dish. Likewise, my boyfriend got me one of those 3 zillion pieces of plastic storage stuff that you can sometimes pick up from service stations (well you could here).

As the years have gone on, I have expanded these collections to incl more pieces and better pieces, but I have to say, there is very little of the original stuff that has actually died. I also have always also considered what the pan/dish/etc will be like when it is full - how easy will I be able to carry it without spilling it (I have weak wrists).

As another point, I would refrain from buying good stuff if you are sharing with strangers. Very quick way to find your good quality kitchenware in someone else's kitchen at some point!

These are just my experiences. Good luck!
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Old 11-27-2007, 08:12 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Goggin View Post
one more thing do you recommend any stores online? that have good deals?
Professional Cookware | Commercial Cookware | Commercial Aluminum Cookware
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Old 11-27-2007, 10:44 AM   #17
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Good thing you remembered the microwave and pyrex ware, Bilby. Of course, a couple of pieces of pyrex (in sizes that would fit inside your microwave) would be perfect since they perform dual duty. You can also pick these things up at practically every garage sale and thrift shop, often for less than a dollar. I have several pyrex measuring cups in 2 and 4 cup capacities. My sons insist on eating soup and cereal out of the 4 cup ones. You may not want to go that far but you can certainly heat things in them.
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Old 11-27-2007, 10:51 AM   #18
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Wow Bowlingshirt, I just clicked on the link for Tundra and the prices are great! Have you ordered from them? I saw all sorts of stuff I "need". Thanks for this!
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Old 11-27-2007, 11:00 AM   #19
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Wow Bowlingshirt, I just clicked on the link for Tundra and the prices are great! Have you ordered from them? I saw all sorts of stuff I "need". Thanks for this!
I've ordered commercial cookware online before, but I can't remember if it was from them or not (it's been a while), plus we also have a local restaurant supply store that's open to the public. It's a good source for inexpensive but decent cookware.
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Old 11-27-2007, 10:16 PM   #20
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Well, for outfitting your first kitchen on a very limited budget ... I would visit garage/yard/estate sales. You can probably find everything you need for basic cooking (1-2 skillets, 1-2 saucepans, a 5-6 qt soup/stock pot), a couple of microwave safe Pyrex bowls, some baking sheets/pans, and dining (plates, bowls, cups, glasses, flatware) for 4 for under $50. I would stear clear of non-stick cookware unless it's from an estate sale - unless it appears to be scratch free. Garage/yard sales are generally only prevalent in the summer - estate sales can happen any time of the year.

You can find the same things in thrift stores like Goodwill or Salvation Army - but they will cost more.

Don't worry if things don't match - that is a design style called eclectic,defined as:A personalized decorative style that combines elements from multiple periods, sources, textures, origins, and styles. Sometimes called "mix and match."

And, you can pick up some things you might need at a 99-Cent/$1 store.

No - this isn't the "ideal" kitchen - but it will get you started. Then, as your finances improve - you can always begin to replace things with better quality stuff.
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