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Old 04-19-2012, 09:23 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aunt Bea View Post
Do you have to cure a pizza stone?

Also, I was watching an old Cooks Country and they placed the stone in the top third of the oven instead of on the bottom or the floor as is usually done. The logic was that the heat rises so the top of the oven is the hottest area and helps concentrate heat to cook the toppings and melt the cheese.

Please give us a full report !
No curing needed for this stone.

Cook's Country's method may work but so does the bottom of the oven method.
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Old 04-19-2012, 09:30 AM   #12
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I'm really curious about the end result rather than the thermal shock values. If it works like a regular ceramic stone and resists breaking, I consider myself a winner.

Yes, $50 is a lot but this is over 16" in diameter and thicker than the one I had. I wanted that size so I can make a little bigger pizza and not have to be too fussy about placing it on the stone so nothing hangs over the edge. If all that comes in a material that won't crack easily, even better.
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Old 04-19-2012, 12:13 PM   #13
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Is this heavier or lighter than a regular stone? I suspect because of the thickness it is a bit heavy.
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Old 04-19-2012, 12:15 PM   #14
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It's fairly heavy. I can't say if it's lifghter or heavier than another type of stone of the same size. If I didn't know, I'd just assume it was a regular pizza stone. It's certainly heavier than my broken 14"-15" stone that's thinner.

While shopping, I saw some Emile Henry stones but they are glazed so I skipped them. To me the whole point is for a stone to be unglazed.
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Old 04-19-2012, 12:57 PM   #15
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Andy, I know you make a great pizza and I'm sure you will be happy with your new stone. Myself, I own a fibrament stone and I'm very happy with it. I cook my pizza's @ 550 degrees and have had no problems with it for the last 10 years. I just feel that buying an American product is something to think about! Why make China richer and US poorer at times like these?
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Old 04-19-2012, 06:20 PM   #16
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Frank, what do you know about this stone material?
I know nuth-ink.. NUTH-INK...

I am just curious to see how it performs. Always like to get the skinny on something that works better.

Do you use a traditional peel for putting pizza in or do you use parchment?

Take a picture of it before you use it, might be the last time it is clean.
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Old 04-19-2012, 06:59 PM   #17
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Originally Posted by FrankZ View Post
I know nuth-ink.. NUTH-INK...

I am just curious to see how it performs. Always like to get the skinny on something that works better.

Do you use a traditional peel for putting pizza in or do you use parchment?

Take a picture of it before you use it, might be the last time it is clean.
I use a wood peel dusted with cornmeal. Similar to yours with a 6" handle.

So I self-cleaned the oven and wiped it out in preparation for pizza tomorrow. Took the stone out of the box and noticed a tiny crack that runs about two inches in from the edge. Back into the box. Going back for a replacement tomorrow. Hopefully I can get an undamaged one.
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Old 04-19-2012, 07:45 PM   #18
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Ouch... at least you found the crack before using the stone. They might have been more contentious if had had burned on cheese when you returned it.

I tried corn meal and didn't like it. I use semolina and I think it works better, and think it tastes better too.
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Old 04-20-2012, 08:46 AM   #19
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I turn the baking pan upside down and put it in the oven, then i preheat it.

i just place my pizza when ready on the pan and bake for 5 minutes and that is all i do.

this way of baking is perfect for thin italian pizza recipes.
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Old 04-20-2012, 04:50 PM   #20
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Quote:
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I turn the baking pan upside down and put it in the oven, then i preheat it.

i just place my pizza when ready on the pan and bake for 5 minutes and that is all i do.

this way of baking is perfect for thin italian pizza recipes.
I have had pretty good luck with that method also. For me it is either two cookie sheets stacked or a large cast iron frying pan turned upside down in the oven. I would still like a pizza stone though and someday one will appear.
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