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Old 11-14-2008, 12:46 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by DOpig View Post
Embarassed to say Farberware...

I was right, then. It is the pan's fault. I had one so I know.
If your Farberware is the type with a thin coating of aluminum on the bottom, that's not thick enough to make a difference.

SS is a poor conductor of heat. It delivers it irratically, causing hot spots and burning of the food in the pan.

Look for a SS pan that is either a tri-ply pan with a layer of aluminum sandwiched inbetween two layers of SS throughput the pan. That's the best option. Another option is a disk on the bottom of the pan that encapsulates a thick piece of aluminum.
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Old 11-14-2008, 12:49 PM   #12
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I have an 8 inch SS pan that I am afraid to use because many of the foods I have cooked in it have either burned or stuck to the bottom. So what little secret can you tell me that will help me develope some skill with SS pans?
I have had the same problem DO!!! I would burn it and then put the pan away for another 3 months before getting the nerve to use it again. I think I finally got the hang of mine.. .kinda like trial and error.
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Old 11-14-2008, 12:52 PM   #13
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Another thing, the SS retains/conducts heat better so you really have to monitor your heat levels. I got the Emeril SS pan... (yes, I help pay Emeril's paycheck!), it is a really nice SS pan with the three layers that Andy speaks about.
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Old 11-14-2008, 12:53 PM   #14
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Looks like I get to go shopping for a new pan!!! And practice makes perfect. Right?
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Old 11-14-2008, 12:58 PM   #15
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That is a relatively thin pan, and SS does not transmit heat as well as other metals. Low heat is better, give the pan a minute to heat. I have only two all-SS pans, an old Revere institutional ware 8" frying pan and a Revere institutional ware 6qt. saucepan. Thick, heavy. I don't use the frying pan often...mostly for eggs, never for potatoes. Or on the BBQ. Starchy foods like to stick to SS, even with what looks like adequate oil. That pan would be best for foods that cook quickly, for sauteing veggies, etc. When I reheat things like turkey, I usually use the SS saucepan with water and a veggie steamer rack and lid. Starchy stuff like potatoes, and sugary stuff like onions, work better in cast iron or black steel, either should be properly cured. I don't use non-stick coated pans, and don't recommend them.
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Old 11-14-2008, 01:15 PM   #16
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Starchy foods like to stick to SS, even with what looks like adequate oil. That pan would be best for foods that cook quickly, for sauteing veggies, etc. Starchy stuff like potatoes, and sugary stuff like onions, work better in cast iron or black steel, either should be properly cured.
Great info! This is just the type of info I love about this site. Do a little lurking, ask a simple question and get a whole lot of info. Thanks!!
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Old 11-14-2008, 03:22 PM   #17
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For me, this extends to my cake pans. I never bake a client's cake in a new pan or pans. I always do a test run because I need to ensure I get even baking, height, etc. For the larger wedding cake pans I have a heater core but I also experiment with it in the different shapes and sizes and with different batters, recording all my results so that when I go to make a real cake I can be assured of perfect results. I don't mind ending up with lots of cake during "play time", but when I am ready for the formal cake I don't have time for errors.

This is a good topic!
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