"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Cookware and Accessories > Cookware
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 10-25-2008, 11:20 AM   #1
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 28
Le Creuset in the real world

We are considering getting a Le Creuset oval French oven 6 3/4 qt size. In their instructions Le Creuset says not to heat an empty pan, does this mean that if we want to brown meat on the stove top prior to cooking in the oven, that we should start with a cold pan , a pan with oil and then preheat , or should we just use it like any other pan, preheat add oil to the warm pan then meat? Another question I have is there much real world difference between using an oval vs the round oven on a ceramic smooth top cooker? Thank you

__________________

__________________
Potato Repairman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-25-2008, 11:29 AM   #2
Chief Eating Officer
 
GB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: USA,Massachusetts
Posts: 25,509
I use my round LC French Oven just like any other pan. I put it empty on a burner all the time and after it is heated I add my oil and food. Just like any other pan, I would not leave it pre-heating for any extended period of time, but I have never had a problem treating it just like any other pan.
__________________

__________________
You know you can't resist clicking
this link. Your eyes will thank you. VISUAL BLISS
GB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-25-2008, 11:50 AM   #3
Head Chef
 
DramaQueen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Las Vegas, Nevada
Posts: 1,347
I NEVER add oil to a hot pan. I always put the oil in then heat it a little then add whatever. I do this with LeC as well as any other pan.
As for the shape there is no difference in cooking with oval vs round. I prefer to use my oval pan when I have something like a chicken or a long beef roast because the food fits better. One good thing about cast iron is that it heats well and holds the heat even if the entire pan isn't sitting on the burner as in the oval shape.
__________________
Visit my blogsite: Chew On This
DramaQueen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-25-2008, 12:17 PM   #4
Sous Chef
 
gadzooks's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: SoCal
Posts: 838
I had that same LeCreuset oval 6 3/4, and gave it away. I use a CI dutch oven, instead. My concern was exactly yours, browning meats before cooking. I was concerned that bringing the pan to a high heat rapidly with only oil in it would cause damage to the enamel. If yes, it would surely ruin the meal.
__________________
gadzooks is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-25-2008, 12:59 PM   #5
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: SE Pennsylvania
Posts: 4,655
You can preheat your Le Creuset as you would any other pan. The enameling is fired at over 1000* F . The New York TImes bread recipe that uses a Le Creuset pan preheats the pan to 500* in the oven before throwing the dough in.

Pot makers always say that so you don't walk away and come back an hour later to a melted or warped pan. One should never leave a pot on the stove unattended like that. But certainly you can get the pan heating for a minute before you add your oil etc. Hot pan, cold oil, food doesn't stick...is the old saying which has some truth about it.
__________________
Robo410 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-25-2008, 01:03 PM   #6
Chief Eating Officer
 
GB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: USA,Massachusetts
Posts: 25,509
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robo410 View Post
The New York TImes bread recipe that uses a Le Creuset pan preheats the pan to 500* in the oven before throwing the dough in.
I forgot all about that. I use my LC for that bread as well. I put it in a 500 degree oven, empty and have never had a problem, not even with the handles.
__________________
You know you can't resist clicking
this link. Your eyes will thank you. VISUAL BLISS
GB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-12-2008, 07:18 PM   #7
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 7
If you're worried about thermal shock, just gradually bring the piece up to heat. There's no reason to just throw it up there on high from the get go.
__________________
JuniperHome is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-13-2008, 09:03 AM   #8
Master Chef
 
jennyema's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Boston
Posts: 9,272
Relax. It's an incredibly sturdy thing -- the workhorse of the kitchen.

I have 3 and use them all the time. I heat them empty all the time and make the NYT bread in them too.

You'll be very glad you bought yours and will probably hand yours down to the grandkids. My mom still has one she got for a wedding gift more than 50 years ago.
__________________

__________________
Less is not more. More is more and more is fabulous.
jennyema is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:37 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.