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Old 10-27-2012, 12:24 AM   #1
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Look what I just bought!

Got a great deal on this Lodge enameled cast iron Dutch Oven! I was really excited about getting it, but DH says I will be sorry, that I won't like it because everything will stick and it will be hard to clean. Any thoughts?


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Old 10-27-2012, 12:46 AM   #2
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No, you will not be sorry!
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Old 10-27-2012, 12:49 AM   #3
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I love my Lodge enameled ware!

I was able to get mine on clearance a few years ago when Walmart changed the brand they carried.
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Old 10-27-2012, 01:29 AM   #4
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Whoo Hoo.......you're gonna love it Bunny! I love my enameled cast iron. I've never had anything stick and it's a dream to clean. I hardly ever use my crock pot anymore because I love cooking on top of the stove with my Dutch Oven the old fashioned way. I like to season as I cook, stir and taste, stir and taste......love that part the best.
Mine is also that pretty red color. I keep it on top of the fridge because it looks so nice up there.

So whatcha gonna make first?
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Old 10-27-2012, 02:27 AM   #5
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First thank you to the mod who fixed my title :-) probably you PF ;-)

Kay, I think the first thing I will cook in it will be my chili for the annual cook-off coming up at my office on Wednesday. I rarely use a crock pot except to keep something warm. This Dutch Oven will replace the cast aluminum DO that I have been using for years (which has probably been frying our brain cells for that long)

PS. I knew DH was going to be wrong :-). I don't know where he gets his info.
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Old 10-27-2012, 08:17 AM   #6
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I love mine for both stove top and oven braising.

I like serving soup from it at the table, it's casual but still has some style, beyond just putting a pot on the table. Being cast iron, it helps keep things warm. I have a short and wide one that I serve casseroles from.
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Old 10-27-2012, 08:36 AM   #7
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I have a Le Creuset that's almost identical. No problems at all with food sticking. I just wouldn't recommend using it for any heavy frying. For instance, if you're going to use it for something like beef stew where you use high heat to sear the meat first, I recommend doing that in a regular saute pan and then transferring the meat to the DO. It just makes things easier. Light frying (sauteing mirepoix, onions, etc.) is not a problem, though.

I've had mine for about 15 years and it still looks like new.
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Old 10-27-2012, 08:41 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Kroll View Post
...For instance, if you're going to use it for something like beef stew where you use high heat to sear the meat first, I recommend doing that in a regular saute pan and then transferring the meat to the DO...
I disagree, Steve, when I make pot roast or chili I sear the meat in my LeCrueset then carry on by adding the liquids and other ingredients to braise. The braising process lifts all the fond and dissolves it into the liquid.

It's easy enough to deglaze the pan.
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Old 10-27-2012, 08:56 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Kroll View Post
I have a Le Creuset that's almost identical. No problems at all with food sticking. I just wouldn't recommend using it for any heavy frying. For instance, if you're going to use it for something like beef stew where you use high heat to sear the meat first, I recommend doing that in a regular saute pan and then transferring the meat to the DO. It just makes things easier. Light frying (sauteing mirepoix, onions, etc.) is not a problem, though.

I've had mine for about 15 years and it still looks like new.
+1
We sear in black cast iron then cook in a Cousances enameled cast iron 'French' oven. I'm leery of the differential between the expansion rates of the enamel and cast iron at screaming hot temps. I think the enameled oven cost us some $130 over 30 years ago.
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Old 10-27-2012, 11:32 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
I disagree, Steve, when I make pot roast or chili I sear the meat in my LeCrueset then carry on by adding the liquids and other ingredients to braise. The braising process lifts all the fond and dissolves it into the liquid.

It's easy enough to deglaze the pan.
I agree with Andy. Steve, how do you find it's easier to use two pans?
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