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Old 12-19-2008, 01:18 PM   #11
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Weight is something you want in cast iron cookware though MasterChefPierre. This is the reason cast iron can suck up and hold onto that heat which gives you even cooking. Griswold had a better casting process which left the pan smoother than Lodge. This is the reason it is so prized. Its lower weight is not a benefit in my book though. It is a drawback.
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Old 12-19-2008, 02:50 PM   #12
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I'm not debating, but Giswold is cast iron still and is a lot heavier than a like product that isn't CI. It might not hold the temp as long when taken off the heat (which could be a good thing), but all the other properties of CI are still there. In my humble opinion.
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Old 12-20-2008, 05:11 AM   #13
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Actually, I've found that my Griswold skillet heats more evenly than my Lodge, despite the lighter weight. Not sure why, my theory has always been that they used a better alloy than Lodge does.
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Old 12-24-2008, 01:58 PM   #14
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I am new to this board and the first think I noticed was the discussion of a Dutch/French oven. I purchased one as a gift from my DH for Christmas and so far had only made chili and soup in it. I always heard how nice they are for roast, etc. However, I have no clue how to cook in one. Are there any simple cookbooks out there? I did buy a Brisket of beef to try, buy again I am lost what to do. Any help would be great.
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Old 12-24-2008, 03:01 PM   #15
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congrats on your brisket success!
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Old 12-24-2008, 03:22 PM   #16
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Thank you, but I did not cook it yet. I don't know how. LOL
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Old 12-26-2008, 02:49 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GB View Post
Weight is something you want in cast iron cookware though MasterChefPierre. This is the reason cast iron can suck up and hold onto that heat which gives you even cooking. Griswold had a better casting process which left the pan smoother than Lodge. This is the reason it is so prized. Its lower weight is not a benefit in my book though. It is a drawback.
ITA.

The heavier the cast iron, the better the pot.
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Old 12-26-2008, 05:36 PM   #18
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I bought a knock off because I didn't want to spring for the Le Crueset $$$$ but I've used it so much I'm wondering if I should have. It's become my favorite pot and gets used at minimum 2 times a week! Welcome to the club - you'll fall in love!
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Old 12-26-2008, 07:05 PM   #19
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I use my LC for so many things - stews, soups, roasts, braising. I like to do a quick pork tenderloin in it - I like to brown the pork stove top in some olive oil and then stick it in a 425 oven for about 20 minutes or so.
So easy and I throw asparagus and some cherry tomatoes into the pot for a quick one pot meal.
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Old 12-26-2008, 08:13 PM   #20
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I am loving this thread. I got 2, yes 2 for Christmas. One was a early gift from my DH, so I have used it a couple of times, making only soup and chili in it. Can't wait to learn how to do other things with it.
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