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Old 12-28-2005, 08:17 PM   #11
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I love my Calaphon non-stick pans, and do use them on almost-high heat all the time. I have 5 different skillet/saute pans and a dutch oven, round casserole, and stock pot/steamer (It's made of something new). Some of them are 5-6 years old and still like new.
If I'm searing something in my skillet, I turn the burner on high and heat the pan for a moment, pour in a few tbls of oil, add the meat and reduce heat by one notch. The meat browns beautifully, and I do get goodies on the bottom.

However...I still use my mom's old cast aluminum dutch oven (circa 1946) to make pot roast, and a huge Magnalite soup pot to make gumbo. I also have a big black & white speckled pot that is wonderful for corn on the cob.

A while back, I bought a stainless steel roaster/lasagna pan on sale for $39.95. It sat in the basement for a long time, but I finally got it out to make lasagna for friends last week. I did use cooking spray on it, but my husband (bless his heart) said it cleaned up beautifully.

I have a lot of nice pieces of cast iron in the basement, and if we ever have to start cooking over an open fire, we'll be glad we have them. But they are just too heavy for me to use, as is Le Creuset.
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Old 03-03-2006, 03:28 PM   #12
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I have a whole bunch of cast iron pans my dad left me when he past away including every size of fry pan,Problem is I have a ceramic top stove and Im not sure how not to break top of stove with these or if you can even use them on ceramic.
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Old 01-17-2007, 09:28 AM   #13
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Exclamation Toxic Nonstick

Teflon and all nonstick surfaces are toxic and should not be used by anyone. Companies who make teflon cookware are being vastly pressured by health-conscious consumers to, at the least, warn people of the toxicity of the products they manufacture. Recently, those companies have admitted that the fumes created by the heating of teflon kills birds and "sickens" people. I cannot imagine anyone wanting to use something that kills a living creature. If it kills a bird quickly because it is small, and it kills a human slowly because we are larger- what is the difference? So, therefore, this is my warning to all of you, and now that you have all been properly warned, I would hope that you would cease using any and all teflon cookware.
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Old 01-17-2007, 10:36 AM   #14
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I have analon anodized aluminum, and mine can go into the oven up to 450 or 500 degrees. I always use it on high heat on the range too. I have been using these pots and pans every day for 3 years, with no damage to the pans at all. The cooing surface doesn't even have a scratch.
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Old 01-17-2007, 11:02 AM   #15
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I am a self admitted cookware junkie. And over the years I've learned that there is no one pan that is right for all jobs or all people. However, a heavy pan (thick metal or ceramic) cooks better and more evenly than a thin one.

(TV loves the SS cause it shows the food so well.)

metal and pottery properties are important to know
1) copper heats and cools quickly so you have great control; anodized aluminum is next down the list.
2) stainless linings are the most durable least reactive. Tin is more responsive but will at somepoint need renewing.
3) enamled cast iron is great for slow cooking and searing...it holds the heat and can take high heat and is non reactive
4) for searing...carbon steel
5) for non stick well seasoned cast iron and teflon
6) soapstone heats as fast as copper, cools as slowly as cast iron, is non reactive, and cooks very well.

Now of all these: copper needs polishing, SS and aluminum need thorough cleaning to remove salts and fats that will damage or gum up the product, cast iron needs the seasoning maintained, enamel can chip, soapstone and ceramic can chip or crack, teflon can scratch and wear out due to heat abuse. Every pan has some issue. Get to know the ins and outs, get a fine collection of a number of different types of pans for different cooking styles and enjoy the heck out of the culinary world!
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Old 01-17-2007, 11:41 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by steveynkatey
Teflon and all nonstick surfaces are toxic and should not be used by anyone. Companies who make teflon cookware are being vastly pressured by health-conscious consumers to, at the least, warn people of the toxicity of the products they manufacture. Recently, those companies have admitted that the fumes created by the heating of teflon kills birds and "sickens" people. I cannot imagine anyone wanting to use something that kills a living creature. If it kills a bird quickly because it is small, and it kills a human slowly because we are larger- what is the difference? So, therefore, this is my warning to all of you, and now that you have all been properly warned, I would hope that you would cease using any and all teflon cookware.
I think that your post is far too alarmist, especially the opening sentence. Although this forum is probably not the place for a heated debate on the topic, your comment should not go unchallenged.

I have a variety of cookware -- SS, cast-iron, enameled cast-iron, anodized aluminum, and nonstick -- and love them all for their specific purposes. I use them correctly and am not at all worried about deleterious effects.
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Old 01-17-2007, 12:04 PM   #17
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Just as we have different knives for different jobs, we also have different pans. I thoroughly enjoy my Calphalon One anodized aluminum pans for must of my cooking. Eggs and fried portatoes go into the non-stick and my cast iron is used outside on the grill and when camping. These are all tools with specific up and downsides as stated earlier. Don't buy into the T.V. chefs and feel bad about what you have. Find out what suits your needs and go for it. After all it's just cooking and it should be fun.

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Old 01-17-2007, 02:33 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by steveynkatey
Teflon and all nonstick surfaces are toxic and should not be used by anyone. Companies who make teflon cookware are being vastly pressured by health-conscious consumers to, at the least, warn people of the toxicity of the products they manufacture. Recently, those companies have admitted that the fumes created by the heating of teflon kills birds and "sickens" people. I cannot imagine anyone wanting to use something that kills a living creature. If it kills a bird quickly because it is small, and it kills a human slowly because we are larger- what is the difference? So, therefore, this is my warning to all of you, and now that you have all been properly warned, I would hope that you would cease using any and all teflon cookware.

I've seen posts like this ever since I started visiting cooking forums beginning when I joined the FTV forums maybe 4 or 5 years ago.

Teflon is not toxic. If you consume teflon flakes for some reason it is inert and will pass through you with no effect at all.

Teflon will outgass but that happens when it reaches almost 600 (574) and if you're using any cooking medium whether oil, lard or shortning they will have reached thier smoke point between 350-450 and the resulting smoke produced will kill your birds just as fast and leave your kitchen full of smoke and you coughing for the severeal hours that it takes the smoke to clear.

As far as sickening, and or killing people, studies have shown that teflon outgassing may cause mild flu like symptoms at worst.

People should do a little reasearch instead of believing every bit of alamest information presented to them.
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Old 01-17-2007, 03:06 PM   #19
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People concerned for their pets should certainly invest in proper ventilation to the outside; even if that means an old fashioned exhaust fan in the wall! I don't know who came up with recirculating smokey air and greese into ones face and hair as a solution for cooking fumes, but it doesn't work and should not be tolerated. Spend a little to gain a lot!
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Old 01-18-2007, 01:44 AM   #20
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I use a Scanpan and love it. It is teflon coated but according to the company there shouldn't be a problem with it. This is what they had to say on their website:

These reports have focused on PFOA and the EPA's review of this chemical as a potential health hazard. Here are the facts:

PFOA is a "carrier chemical" that appears during the production of Teflon® and other PTFE raw materials. During the production process, all PFOA is 100% removed and captured in filters, which are then discarded in compliance with applicable laws. THAT is where the EPA comes in – on the environmental side of the raw material manufacturers. The PFOA issue is an EPA issue, not an FDA issue.

It is unfortunate that the media shows the image of a Teflon® pan while reporting on PFOA. They should show the image of a factory producing PTFE and capturing and filtering out the PFOA.

There is no PFOA present in the finished product.

SCANPAN Cookware is PFOA free.

All SCANPAN Cookware imports from Denmark are FDA certified and safe to use for food preparation.
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