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Old 10-16-2012, 12:02 AM   #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dawgluver

Yes! That's it.

I would think they'd be easy to make from old potholders too, just split and stitch. Or even old Kevlar glove fingers, which should be ovenproof. Cut off a few fingers, thread them on the handle, and leave the fingertip on the last one.
I have had crocheted handle protectors. They look like little Mexican hats when they aren't on the handles. They are so cute. Mom had them when I was growing up. Grandma made them with spare yarn.
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Old 10-16-2012, 09:45 PM   #32
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Thanks to my first husband and Son #2, I have a couple of restaurant pans that have metal handles. I won't have one with a so called safe-for-the-oven black handle. I don't trust them. I just have the feeling that they will melt in there. Call them what you will, to me they are plastic. Even my DO has metal handles.
Yeah maybe you're worried about it, but have you ever seen one melt? Not me. None of my pans have had melted handles in the oven whether they were advertised as oven safe or not.
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Old 10-16-2012, 10:15 PM   #33
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Originally Posted by Greg Who Cooks View Post
Yeah maybe you're worried about it, but have you ever seen one melt? Not me. None of my pans have had melted handles in the oven whether they were advertised as oven safe or not.
I agree. Pans with plastic handles are typically OK in the oven to at least 350ºF.
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Old 10-17-2012, 10:31 AM   #34
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The handles are made from thermo-setting plastics, the kind that just get harder, and stronger when they are heated. Thermosetting plastics, such as bakelite, and epoxy, exhibit great strength, electrical resistance, and heat resistance.

When they exceed their temperature limits, thermosetting plastics burn. Bu they never become soft, like thermoplastics do.

In kitchen ware of the 1950's, and onward, bakelite handles were very common on pots and pans. bakelite was also used as a material to house or contain, or support electrical wires. Bakelite is brittle, but very tough, with significant tensile strength, and heat and chemical resistant. Epoxy has these same traits, but is more flexible. Also, a chemical reaction in the two part epoxys creates the heat that cures the plastic, where bakelite is injected as a liquid into a mold, and external heat is applied to harden the plastic.

Bakelite handles on pots and pans are oven safe to the maximum, allowable temperature, at which point, they will burn. That temperature is 350' for up to an hour. Above that, you degrade the handle.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 10-17-2012, 11:08 AM   #35
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Demeyere cookware

I use Demeyere cookware, made in Belgium. It is all metal of the highest quality construction. Will outlast a lifetime. Handles will not get hot on the stovetop. Ever.
www.surlatable.com/Demeyere
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Old 10-17-2012, 11:19 AM   #36
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I use Demeyere cookware, made in Belgium. It is all metal of the highest quality construction. Will outlast a lifetime. Handles will not get hot on the stovetop. Ever.
www.surlatable.com/Demeyere

Which of the Demeyere lines do you have Chef M?
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Old 10-17-2012, 11:26 AM   #37
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Which of the Demeyere lines do you have Chef M?
I have a couple of the pro-line skillets and 5 piece saucepans. I love them. I bought them 10 years ago and they look like new after heavy use.
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Old 10-17-2012, 09:33 PM   #38
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I use Demeyere cookware, made in Belgium. It is all metal of the highest quality construction. Will outlast a lifetime. Handles will not get hot on the stovetop. Ever.
That reminds me of my second favorite wok. My third-est (is that a word?) favorite wok rusted out years ago because it wasn't stainless steel--there's a lot of those on the inexpensive wok market. You wash and dry them quickly or they rust. I didn't. It did.

So getting back to my secondest favorite wok, it cooks pretty good, it's got a non-stick surface that's really hard but it's the handle I'm remarking on. It has a really nice rolled stainless steel handle BUT it's open at both ends, so it perfectly channels hot gasses from the burner up through the handle and provides a jet of superheated gasses at the end of the handle.

I've learned to not grab the handle... most of the time.

That's why I don't like metal handles. At least with a cast iron skillet you know it's going to be hot. Other cookware varies.
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Old 10-17-2012, 11:43 PM   #39
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Originally Posted by Greg Who Cooks View Post
That reminds me of my second favorite wok. My third-est (is that a word?) favorite wok rusted out years ago because it wasn't stainless steel--there's a lot of those on the inexpensive wok market. You wash and dry them quickly or they rust. I didn't. It did.

So getting back to my secondest favorite wok, it cooks pretty good, it's got a non-stick surface that's really hard but it's the handle I'm remarking on. It has a really nice rolled stainless steel handle BUT it's open at both ends, so it perfectly channels hot gasses from the burner up through the handle and provides a jet of superheated gasses at the end of the handle.

I've learned to not grab the handle... most of the time.

That's why I don't like metal handles. At least with a cast iron skillet you know it's going to be hot. Other cookware varies.
Most professional woks are high carbon steel. They are tough, sturdy, and will last several lifetimes. But like cast iron, they need to be seasoned. Once that is done, they will outperform all other woks made from other materials.

Wok cooking is usually done at temperatures that will destroy non-stick coatings. And cast iron woks are so ridiculously heavy as to eliminate
the possibility of hand manipulating them.

As steel, like any ferrous metal, is a poor heat conductor, it is ideal for wok cooking. Only the bottom gets sizzling hot. The food is rapidly cooked in the wok bottom, and moved up the sides to hold at a lower temperature. The hand-hammered wok is especially designed to do this. The little indentations hold the foods that have been pushed up the sides, on the sides. When all of the ingredients are cooked, they are all mixed together, or poured into their own containers.

Yes, High carbon steel woks will rust like crazy if not seasoned. But so do mineral pans and cast iron. Even aluminum and stainless steel will corrode if not taken care of.

I have a high carbon steel, flat bottom wok that I've been using for better than 20 years. It has no corrosion on it, and makes everything from chili to pop corn perfectly.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 10-18-2012, 12:44 AM   #40
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North View Post
The handles are made from thermo-setting plastics, the kind that just get harder, and stronger when they are heated. Thermosetting plastics, such as bakelite, and epoxy, exhibit great strength, electrical resistance, and heat resistance.

When they exceed their temperature limits, thermosetting plastics burn. Bu they never become soft, like thermoplastics do.

In kitchen ware of the 1950's, and onward, bakelite handles were very common on pots and pans. bakelite was also used as a material to house or contain, or support electrical wires. Bakelite is brittle, but very tough, with significant tensile strength, and heat and chemical resistant. Epoxy has these same traits, but is more flexible. Also, a chemical reaction in the two part epoxys creates the heat that cures the plastic, where bakelite is injected as a liquid into a mold, and external heat is applied to harden the plastic.

Bakelite handles on pots and pans are oven safe to the maximum, allowable temperature, at which point, they will burn. That temperature is 350' for up to an hour. Above that, you degrade the handle.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
I worked on the edge of Chinatown in Boston for a short while. One day I went to the supermarket that the Chinese shop in. I was looking at their cooking untensils. They had woks by the piles. You could see that they were handmade. And for the average Chinese family, these are often passed on down through the years. Like we pass down our CI pans. They tresure these woks. And they take care of them with love.
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