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Old 02-10-2015, 07:12 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by Daizymae View Post
Mad Cook: "(Occasionally a tart can be made on a flat-ish plate and filled with jam but we won't go there now.)"

Er...how long does "now" last?

Can you direct me to recipes for such a tart as you describe above? I have lots o' home-made jam that I am looking to use for...a tart.

Gracias.
Here's one example, no special pan needed!

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/f...te-recipe.html
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Old 02-10-2015, 10:46 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by Daizymae View Post
Do you bake your pastry case "blind"? ie with no filling in it? You might find this works better than putting the filling on top of the raw pastry.

I just follow the instructions on the recipe, and usually they recommend to blind bake. Am not a highly experienced baker, but the other day I thought I'd try again to make a tart. However, the pastry portion of the recipe called for:

1 C. of flour and only 1/4 cup of butter.

Even I know that sounds goofy but I did it anyway. We could not eat the result, we just scraped the filling out...feh.

Any comments, anyone? I'm enjoying this discussion thoroughly and getting lots of good advice here.
That is exactly the proportion for a tart crust. From the New York Times site:

Basic Short-Crust Pastry Recipe - NYT Cooking

I've added 1/8 cup sugar for a sweet crust, but the flour and butter are the same.
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Old 02-11-2015, 03:44 AM   #23
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Yes, I am a consultant for Amoretti, and that is what I do. I provide product descriptions and create recipes using their products for publication on their web pages. Of course, I am required to prepare the recipes I create to make sure they are both feasible and delicious.
Lucky you. Great job!
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Old 02-11-2015, 03:53 AM   #24
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Originally Posted by PrincessFiona60 View Post
That is exactly the proportion for a tart crust. From the New York Times site:

Basic Short-Crust Pastry Recipe - NYT Cooking

I've added 1/8 cup sugar for a sweet crust, but the flour and butter are the same.
Whether it be a premade bought in the store crust or a recipe, I find that most recipes don't add enough salt. They have a very flat taste. Thank goodness that recipe adds more then the pinch or 1/8 tsp. of salt. I do like the idea of adding sugar for a dessert pastry. I want the pastry crust to be as favorable as the filling. Otherwise it just remains on the plate and goes uneaten.
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Old 02-11-2015, 04:14 PM   #25
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Originally Posted by PrincessFiona60 View Post
That is exactly the proportion for a tart crust. From the New York Times site:

Basic Short-Crust Pastry Recipe - NYT Cooking

I've added 1/8 cup sugar for a sweet crust, but the flour and butter are the same.
Thanks for your response, but I interpret the above recipe differently:

About ratio of flour to butter, 1 Cup of flour to 1/2 Cup of butter is indeed the way to go, as is indicated above.

1/2 cup of butter would be 1 stick the way I read it here:

Online Conversion - Butter Conversion

1 stick cold unsalted butter (1/4 pound) = 1/2 cup.

The recipe I used and was complaining about had a ratio of 1 cup of flour to 1/4 cup of butter. Not enough fat and the result was hard as a rock.
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Old 02-11-2015, 06:30 PM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Daizymae View Post
Mad Cook: "(Occasionally a tart can be made on a flat-ish plate and filled with jam but we won't go there now.)"

Er...how long does "now" last?

Can you direct me to recipes for such a tart as you describe above? I have lots o' home-made jam that I am looking to use for...a tart.

Gracias.
No recipe Just roll out your shortcrust pastry and lay it on a plate (I use an old enamel one or a metal one is good. Ovenproof china, ceramic or Pyrex glass will do but the pastry might not be as crisp. Spoon your favourite jam onto pastry leaving a border and use the pastry trimmings to cut a few narrow strips of pastry twist them and lay from edge to edge of the tart in any design you prefer - criss-cross, asterisk=*, etc. Bake in a hot-ish oven (whatever temp you usually back pastry at.) but don't let the jam burn.

I can't help you with the Birds custard as this is a weird British delicacy that comes as a powder in a packet and you mix with milk and sugar and boil up to thicken. Nothing like a proper custard made with eggs but essential for jam tart, roly poly pudding, spotted dick (yes, really! A steamed pudding with currants in it) and a hundred or so other British puddings.

I think that covers it, doesn't it Menumaker? Us Brits specialise in comfort food - I think it's the weather.
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Old 02-13-2015, 12:34 AM   #27
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Thank you for those baking instructions.

I remember Birds Custard and I am in Canada. I never ate it but my husband's family did. They are English/Scotch.

I have an oldish (Canadian) cookbook, about 1950, coming apart at the seams. There is a recipe for roly poly pudding that my young son forced me to make for him years ago because he liked Beatrix Potter's story of Tom Kitten and the Roly Poly Pudding...could I make this up!

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...Tom_Kitten.jpg

Spotted Dick - LOL!
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Old 02-13-2015, 08:13 AM   #28
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Originally Posted by Daizymae View Post
Thanks for your response, but I interpret the above recipe differently:

About ratio of flour to butter, 1 Cup of flour to 1/2 Cup of butter is indeed the way to go, as is indicated above.

1/2 cup of butter would be 1 stick the way I read it here:

Online Conversion - Butter Conversion

1 stick cold unsalted butter (1/4 pound) = 1/2 cup.

The recipe I used and was complaining about had a ratio of 1 cup of flour to 1/4 cup of butter. Not enough fat and the result was hard as a rock.
Sorry, I had a human moment there.
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Old 02-13-2015, 10:31 AM   #29
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Moment? Moment? I have about 1300 of those a day. LOL!
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