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Old 02-03-2015, 06:00 PM   #1
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Please help me find a use for this cooking pan.

At the bottom of my kitchen drawer I found a shiny tin, made-in-France, old cooking dish which I believe is called a QUICHE or TART MOULD with a removable bottom - a flat, thin disk.

This cooking dish has large flutes and flares outwards. That is, at the top it is 8" and at the bottom it is 6.5 inches. This pan is about 2" deep.

I've never used it before, so I tried to make a standard-issue vegetable & egg quiche. The pastry crust stayed stuck to the top of the flutes and I had to carefully carve it out.

Same thing happened with an ordinary cake that I made. I buttered the bottom and sides and sprinkled bread crumbs. The cake rose slightly over level.

Can someone advise, please? What are you supposed to bake in these things so that they'll come out easily? Many thanks. Obviously, I don't know what these things were designed for...

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Old 02-03-2015, 06:04 PM   #2
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Sounds like a tart pan
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Old 02-03-2015, 06:12 PM   #3
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So, what is meant by a "tart"? Can you be specific, please. I'm not much of a baker. (I know what "tarts" are...)
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Old 02-03-2015, 06:45 PM   #4
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A tart is a pastry that usually uses a short crust and is filled. Commonly filled with fruit and pastry cream or a custard of some sort.
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Old 02-03-2015, 06:47 PM   #5
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Old 02-03-2015, 07:10 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Daizymae View Post
So, what is meant by a "tart"? Can you be specific, please. I'm not much of a baker. (I know what "tarts" are...)
Try Google:
https://www.google.com/search?q=tart...ed=0CAYQ_AUoAQ
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Old 02-03-2015, 07:46 PM   #7
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If the pan is clean a pie crust should come out without any preparation to the pan. Some people remove them from the pan by setting the finished tart on a 28 ounce can and gently easing the ring down off the tart, the tart itself is supported by the metal disc.

If I was baking a cake in it I would grease and flour the pan or use a Joy of Baking type spray that contains a mixture of fat and flour. Again the pan must me very clean. I often see these older pans at estate sales, many of them have baked on "crud" or little rust spots that can make it difficult to remove the ring.

Take a look.

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Old 02-03-2015, 07:53 PM   #8
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Wow, that's a terrific method. Why didn't I think of that??? By the way, my tart pan is like new. For some reason it has been in my drawer for ages, unused.

Steve: I looked at that blueberry tart on wikipedia and I see that maybe my crust was too high and got stuck along the edge. Also, my tart pan is not your common shallow kind. It is flared outwards and quite deep - 2". I wonder if that is a factor or not.

Thank you very much indeed for all your input, all of you.
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Old 02-04-2015, 09:23 AM   #9
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I live in France, Have one of the beggers, use it quite often for quiches and sweet tarts and we ( it and me) have a love-hate relationship. It never sticks when I make something unimportant on a wet Wednesday night for instance , but the time I use it for us +guests it gets nasty and sticks like hell. I won't let it come out to play anymore for dinner parties, it's just too rude. The method advised above though does work best. Good luck, give it a smack from me
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Old 02-04-2015, 10:04 AM   #10
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Love you to bits, menumaker! You made my day. It isn't just me, then...

But I looked on youtube for cooks extracting their quiches from their fluted pans and it seems to work.

While I'm here: Even though the pastry has tons of butter, the cooks on youtube apply butter to the bottom & sides of the tart pan before placing the crust in. What do you think of that.

Also, do you have the standard kind of tart cooking dish or the deep kind with large flutes like I do?
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