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Old 07-14-2007, 12:15 PM   #31
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I agree that a mixed bag will give you better results. For frying pans, Like AllenMi, I like cast iron. It'll give you great results for all of your frying and saute'ing needs. It is also bulletproof (very durable), and if the seasoning is messed up, it is easily repaired by re-seasoning. It goes from the stove-top to the oven with ease and is versatile enough to fry chicken, bake pizza, simmer a pot roast, and fry eggs. I even use mine occasionally to boil spaghetti in.

Stainless steel saucepans are a must. Get pans with features you will use, such as encapsulated disk bottoms to distribute heat evenly, tight fitting lids, maybe a double-boiler attachment. Get sizes that will allow you to make small batches for such things as cheese sauce or gravies. Get another pan to make family-sized one-pot meals, like soups, stews, etc. And get a stainless stock pot. Another great cooking vessel is the pressure cooker. They come in various levels of price, ranging from about $30 to better than $100. When you learn to use them properly, they greatly shorten cooking time.

This advice is my opinion, and should be taken as such. Your cooking needs and wants may be sustantially different than mine. But a few good cast iorn pans, maybe an eight-inch stainless pan, and some good pots will serve you well for most of you cooking needs. Of course, over time, as your cooking skills grow, you will want to add specialty pans, like a good roasting pan, that can maybe work for making lasagna as well.

Great cookwear doesn't have to cost $1200 per set. You can find great stuff at yard and estate sales. And remember, if you really had to, you can boil water in a paper cup. We did it in boy scouts, over a bed of glowing embers.

A guy who used to be on a previous site that I enjoyed used to close all of his replies with something to this effect, paraphased due to my imperfect memory; What goes into the pot is far more important than is the pot.

Seeeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 07-15-2007, 08:09 AM   #32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by buckytom
btw, the dangerous chemical, ptfe, has been known to be released at temps around 500 to 550. i'm not sure which #'s are accurate, but a pan left on a burner will reach even higher than 600 if mistakenly left unattended for several minutes. same goes for a non-stick pan left in an oven set to self-cleaning cycle.
The outgassing temperature for teflon is 574°.

Some cooking oils will reach thier smoke point under 400° and a wrong setting on the toaster will fill your kitchen with smoke which is leathal to some birds but people don't mention these facts when warning about the detrimental effects of teflon.

So the next time you set the smoke alarm off because you wanted put a nice sear on a steak or when stir frying make sure there are no birds close by.
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Old 07-16-2007, 03:57 PM   #33
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If you're looking for a couple of items to try I suggest you get a few items that don't normally come in a set that you will want to have anyway like a pan that's good for starting on the cooktop and then finishing in the oven such as the cuisinart 12" everyday pan.

Amazon.com: Cuisinart Chef's Classic Stainless 12-Inch Everyday Pan with Medium Dome Cover: Kitchen & Housewares

or maybe an Anolon 11" 5 qt. sauteuse.

Amazon.com: Anolon 5 Quart 11-Inch Sauteuse with Glass Lid: Kitchen & Housewares

The 12" everyday pan can be used like any 12" fry pan but bercause of the handle design it's better for oven usage.

The 11" sautuese can take the place of a 12" saute pan and a 5 qt. dutch oven and maybe even a 10" saute pan.
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Old 07-16-2007, 09:32 PM   #34
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I'm happy with my Emeril set of SS with glass lids. I bought the 10 piece set, including the lids, on sale for about $125-150 just over a year ago. They are sold at Dept. stores. The bottoms are tri-ply (they're made by same company that makes the popular tri-ply pots & pans - I can't remember the name of the company). They are reasonably heavy w/o being impossible to lift. The solid SS handles have an indentation for the thumb, which makes it comfortable to handle. I use all of the pieces, although some more than others. Included in the set were two pans that could be nested together to be used as a double boiler. I thought they were a good buy. I do have a 10" non-stick pan for eggs.

Good luck with your purchase! This thread has given you some great ideas.
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Old 07-17-2007, 10:20 AM   #35
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I may be wrong but I'm thinking Emerilware is made in China while AllClad is only made in the USA.

If you can get a 10 pc set of Emerilware SS for $125 that's a good deal but the normal $199 that it usually costs is too much.

You can get Cuisinart Chef's Classic SS for around $120 for the 10 pc set.
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Old 07-17-2007, 11:06 AM   #36
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emerilware is part of allclad, but is made in china. It is disc botttom encapsulated ss. THere is also an enameled steel line now, a few cast iron pieces, and a stick free anodized aluminum line (all made in china).

A company like allclad probably supervises the quality control pretty well. THat is not the case with all asian imports.
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Old 07-17-2007, 02:16 PM   #37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron W.
I may be wrong but I'm thinking Emerilware is made in China while AllClad is only made in the USA.

If you can get a 10 pc set of Emerilware SS for $125 that's a good deal but the normal $199 that it usually costs is too much.

You can get Cuisinart Chef's Classic SS for around $120 for the 10 pc set.
I don't know where the Emerilware is made, never gave it a thought. I do like the glass lids. The Cuisinart Chef's Classic SS has the SS lids.

Emerilware does have the disc bottom while All-Clad is tri-ply all around, I think. I do think Emerilware is well made. I saw Wolfgang Puck's products. The handle is rolled, hollow. Difficult to hold. I'm not sure if I remember, but I don't think the lids were glass, which is a feature I like. The Emerilware can be purchased on sale from time to time. I also rec'd a gift after purchase. A really nice knife was sent to me, 7 in. blade made by Wusthof for Emeril. I was happy with my purchase.
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