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Old 03-20-2012, 02:43 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
I think we agree with that.

However, the industry names straight sided pans as sauté pans and slope sided pans as frying pans. We all have to adjust to that standard. The cookware industry isn't going to change.
But they already DID change. Thats the problem.
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Old 03-20-2012, 02:52 PM   #12
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But they already DID change. Thats the problem.
Yes, and that's why they won't change again.
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Old 03-20-2012, 03:40 PM   #13
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Instead of buying by name, buy by function
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Old 03-20-2012, 03:52 PM   #14
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They are all skillets to me....Straight sides, Sloped sides....I saute in them, I fry in them... it's a skillet~~ Big skillet, little skillet, real big skillet, cornbread skillets, chicken skillets, egg skillets, cast iron, SS, aluminum etc. Then there are pots (sometimes referred to as "buckets" or boilers) Big pots, little pots, cast iron pots, SS pots, Oyster pots, French Fry Pot, Sara Beth pot...Pot with broken handle, Stock pots, Gumbo pots, Jambalaya pot. Pea pot ~~ I could go on and on...but ya get the idea.

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Old 03-20-2012, 05:19 PM   #15
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Just as with every other discipline, cooking has jargon. jargon is peculiar words or names and phrases used to describe a thing, process, or action. In electronics, the jargon can be mind-bending as it includes jargon from physics, electronics, and mathematics, all rolled into one discipline. And there is so much of it.

In cooking, I find myself using similar jargon that is unfamiliar to my wife. For instance, the China-Cap, or Chinois is used to describe a cone-shaped strainer that sits in a frame, and usually comes with a wooden pestle that forces the food through the chinois. My DW got angry with me for using the term because she was unfamiliar with it and didn't know what I was asking her to get for me.

In electronics, when writing any kind of documentation, or report, it's usually for people not trained in the discipline, layperson if you will. We have to translate the jargon into something the layperson will be able to understand. The tools and techniques used in cooking have become so diverse and complex, not to mention how much is now available that wasn't 30 years back, that it behooves us to learn the jargon, and to be able to communicate to others without baffling them with unfamiliar terms.

Now that I've given my treatise on jargon and tech-report writing technique, I will say simply that I love UncleBob's post. That pretty much sums it up for me. Though I know a good bit of the cooking world jargon, I need to be able to communicate that knowledge to others who know virtually none of it.

I think I'll now go home and saute' some coconut shrimp in a cast-iron saute pan, which will have just a bit of cooking oil in it. I'll make a bit of rice in my covered dutch oven, and a light velute' in my saucier'. Maybe I'll steam some Haricot Verts and dress them with a compound butter bended with garlic and dill. All of this will be served with an ice-cold glass tumbler filled with milk.

Bwahahaha!

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 03-20-2012, 05:57 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Uncle Bob View Post
They are all skillets to me....Straight sides, Sloped sides....I saute in them, I fry in them... it's a skillet~~ Big skillet, little skillet, real big skillet, cornbread skillets, chicken skillets, egg skillets, cast iron, SS, aluminum etc. Then there are pots (sometimes referred to as "buckets" or boilers) Big pots, little pots, cast iron pots, SS pots, Oyster pots, French Fry Pot, Sara Beth pot...Pot with broken handle, Stock pots, Gumbo pots, Jambalaya pot. Pea pot ~~ I could go on and on...but ya get the idea.
yeah what he said!
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Old 03-20-2012, 06:30 PM   #17
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"We all have to adjust to that standard." We all may need to do lots of things. I however, know what Pan I like to use for which purpose.

Plus 1 for what Uncle Bob says.
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Old 03-20-2012, 06:44 PM   #18
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Originally Posted by Whiskadoodle View Post
"We all have to adjust to that standard." We all may need to do lots of things. I however, know what Pan I like to use for which purpose.

Plus 1 for what Uncle Bob says.

I agree with you and UB. However, I said 'we all have to adjust...' because we want to make ourselves understood outside our own kitchens.
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Old 03-21-2012, 08:28 AM   #19
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In these times of semantic confusion the important thing is not to make any confusion with the ingredients!

In Italy we basically have padella, pentola, tegame and casseruola (and teglia, but teglia is unmistakably a baking pan).
There is indeed some confusion between padella and tegame, while pentola and casseruola are more clearly understood.
The following definitions are the more widely accepted (IMHO):
Padella is a round cooking tool, large and shallow, with a single long handle and sloping sides, generally used for frying (I use a big padella to prepare my risotto or to finish some pasta recipes, too).
Tegame is a round cooking tool, with one or two handles and not too tall straight or slightly sloping sides, used to braise (generally vegetables) or fry (generally eggs).
Pentola is a round cooking tool more tall than wide and with two handles (we cook our pasta in a pentola).
Casseruola is a cooking tool similar to the tegame, but taller.

Buon appetito!
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Old 03-21-2012, 05:43 PM   #20
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pots and pans

if a recipe says use a skillet .......would this be a frying pan or saute pan? Is it based on what your making? bec. read a skillet same as a frying pan and with whats out there frying pans are sloped side and a saute pan is straight,how does skillet come into play on which to use? yes i know a lot of you will sigh about this,sorry but since mom is getting me a set of pots and pans ,i would like to know.
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