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Old 02-22-2007, 03:30 AM   #41
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bushy
Hi -
Oh - for what it's worth: a pressure cooker's 15 psi is not particularly impressive - my car's tires are inflated to 30 psi.
Taking that statement into account, you should definitely never get a pressure cooker.
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Old 02-22-2007, 04:10 AM   #42
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StirBlue
Taking that statement into account, you should definitely never get a pressure cooker.
Then I suppose I shouldn't mention the 3000 psi in a SCUBA tank, huh...

The point is that, on a relative scale, a p/c is not worth fearing.

Next up: hydroforming...
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Old 02-22-2007, 04:58 AM   #43
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bushy
Then I suppose I shouldn't mention the 3000 psi in a SCUBA tank, huh...

The point is that, on a relative scale, a p/c is not worth fearing.

Next up: hydroforming...
You would not go scuba diving unless you learned how to operate the equipment.
You put the proper size tires on your car and inflate them according to the recommended safety factor.
You read the information and instructions for a pressure cooker and follow through.

When a scuba tank runs out of air, it's done. When a tire blows, it done.
When a pressure cooker blows, the lid does not pop off and that's it.
When a pressure cooker blows, the regulator pop's off and boiling hot steam and food is being sprayed toward the ceiling and it does not stop until the heat is turned off.

The only time a pressure cooker can really get you into trouble is when you neglect to read the instructions and procedures for it. "People borrow pressure cookers and start using them based on spunned up advice" or "they buy them used" with no instructions and start using them not knowing how it works.

There are far more fry pan grease fires than pressure cooker mishaps. My actual point in my first post today was the quality of the food cooked in a pressure cooker is not very good.
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Old 02-22-2007, 05:53 AM   #44
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bushy
Then I suppose I shouldn't mention the 3000 psi in a SCUBA tank, huh...

The point is that, on a relative scale, a p/c is not worth fearing.

Next up: hydroforming...
Maybe the pressure isn't but the hot steam and flying parts are. It is comparing apples to oranges and not relative.
That said, the new PCs have a lot of safety features--like two safety valves, in most cases.

I have no idea at this point if I answered earlier, but I LOVE LOVE LOVE my PC--have only had it about a year.

Dried bean soup in under an hour.
Beef stew in half an hour.
Artichokes perfectly cooked in 10 minutes.
Perfect risotto in 10 minutes total.
Whole cauliflower just blanched for a perfect salad.
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Old 02-22-2007, 07:58 AM   #45
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bushy
a p/c is not worth fearing.
This is a recipe for a serious accident and potentially death. Please, if you get a pressure cooker rethink this. Treat is with respect. OK, you don't really need to fear it, but don't think that just because it has low psi compared to other things you know that it can not be dangerous. Neither your scuba tank nor car tires are stilling on a stovetop with liquid and fat that is above the boiling point ready to explode like a grenade.


Quote:
Originally Posted by bushy
is there any down side to using a p/c much, much larger than is needed?
Why would you want to get one larger than what you need? why not get the right size tool for the job at hand?
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Old 02-22-2007, 09:36 AM   #46
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Stirblue, you do not paint a very good picture of PC cooking. And I do appreciate your candor. I think varying opinions makes for good discussion and hopefully an informed decision for someone like myself sitting on the fence. This statement: "There is no savored flavor using a pressure cooker. All the nutrition is simply killed. And the food is always overdone!" has peaked my interest.

I've only ever had one thing that was cooked in a PC. It was good, but I can't even remember what it was as it was several years ago. I see Emeril whipping up some pretty tasty looking stuff in his PC, of course I can only assume it tastes as good as it looks and still has nutritional value. Also, he depressurizes the cooker right there in front of us.... no 30 minute wait (unless I misunderstood you on this).

I don't know where I'm going with this other than I've been thinking of getting one for occassional use, but now have other opinions to weigh in.

My question to the group is, can you cook frozen food in one?
I work at home and usually have plenty of time to get a meal ready. My problem is taking meat out of the freezer in order to thaw it properly. I certainly wouldn't mind something that speeds up the cooking process, whether it will allow me to cook with fozen food, or allow faster preparation if the food isn't thawed until 8:30 that night.
If the meals aren't as tasty as slow cooking methods, the positives of PC cooking may not outweigh the negatives in my case.

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Old 02-22-2007, 09:56 AM   #47
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I didn't read StirBlue's post but don't agree with what has been quoted above. I have made stews that taste just as good and rich as one that is cooked long. I cannot tell the difference in my 7 minute risotto, nor in my pea soup. I don't use it (the PC) all the time, but enjoy it greatly when I do.
I think you will need to thaw your meat. You can put it in the fridge the night before to thaw--or if you work at home do it in the morning.
Sometimes you de-pressurize quickly (to stop the cooking process) and sometimes you let it come down on its own--or you can allow that. It depends on what you are cooking.
I would not recommend getting a PC under 6qts. You can only fill them a bit over half way. Sometimes I wish mine were 8qts, but usually it is just fine.
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Old 02-22-2007, 10:12 AM   #48
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If available in your neck of the globe, you might want to look at cookbooks by Lorna Sass. She's published a number of cookbooks that focus on cooking meals using a pressure cooker.
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Old 02-22-2007, 10:38 AM   #49
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Wow..... the one I was looking at, which is pretty pricey I think, is only 2 qts!
Here's a link: One Pot-shop EMERILS.com It looks roomy enough on TV and I do live by myself, but like to cook enough for leftovers.

I've got a problem with my fridge and thawing. Sometimes overnight is enough, sometimes I need a couple days. The temp can vary by 10 degrees easily and often drops below freezing, but it's better than going the other way. I like my adult beverage cold . Bought it brand new 5 yrs ago, too

You don't know how many times I've almost ordered that little electric convection oven that cooks frozen food in minutes.... but the smarter side of my brain prevailed.
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Old 02-22-2007, 10:52 AM   #50
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GB
...
Why would you want to get one larger than what you need? why not get the right size tool for the job at hand?
Being poor, I'm looking at ebay, and the smallest ones are few and far between - 4 qt and 6 qt models are all over the place.

And, for those concerned that I'm likely to commit suicide by pressure cooker:

Not very likely - I have great respect for tools that can harm me, and have used gear MUCH more lethal, and am still here, with just a couple scars.

If you want scary, try this:

I once started to build an airplane (notice I did NOT say 'model').
One of the chemicals (MEKP, 50% in a stabilizer) which, if it gets into your eye, you have 4 SECONDS to wash it out before it destroys the cornea.

But thank you for your concern and your welcoming sentiments they are appreciated
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