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Old 10-14-2004, 08:02 PM   #1
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Really nice pizza stone?

Hi Everyone!

Does anyone know where to get a really good pizza stone? I am thinking 14" x 16" rectangular, and probably 1.5" - 2.0" thick. Something that can really hold the heat in.

Thanks.

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Old 10-14-2004, 08:03 PM   #2
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Buy an uncoated tile at the hardware store. Cheaper and works just as well.
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Old 10-14-2004, 09:24 PM   #3
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Another alternative would be fire brick - the stuff they line fireplaces with and use to make brick ovens. It is generally 9" x 4.5" by 2"-2.5" thick.
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Old 10-14-2004, 09:59 PM   #4
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unglazed quarry tiles. Cheap and you can put like 4 of them in your oven on the bottom rack.
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Old 10-14-2004, 10:01 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael in FtW
Another alternative would be fire brick - the stuff they line fireplaces with and use to make brick ovens. It is generally 9" x 4.5" by 2"-2.5" thick.
Hmm that sounds close to what I want. I could probably get a few and place them next to eachother.

Any idea where to get them?
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Old 10-14-2004, 10:10 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MJ
unglazed quarry tiles. Cheap and you can put like 4 of them in your oven on the bottom rack.
I went to home depot the other day looking for these and I couldnt find them. I found big cement slabs outside in garden section... but nothing labeled unglazed quarry tiles. Perhaps I was looking in the wrong spot.
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Old 10-15-2004, 12:59 AM   #7
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Some Home Depot stores carry them ... also check in your phonebook under "brick" and call around. Some places call this firebrick, some call it kiln brick. It'll take forever to heat up .. and forever to cool down (kind of like cast iron) but it's relatively cheap and as good as those oven inserts that cost 10 times as much.

Oh - no - the cement blocks/slabs are NOT the same ....
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Old 10-15-2004, 04:54 AM   #8
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I'm big on DIY, less expensive solutions, but unglazed quarry tiles are a bit of a gamble. Because they aren't made for the thermal shock of baking bread/pizza, there is a small possibility they can chip. If one of these chips/shards get's into your bread/pizza crust and you or a guest bites into it, it will chip your tooth. Believe me, I know.

It's better to use materials specifically engineered for the shock of baking - a baking stone or fire brick. I went with fire brick because it was a LOT cheaper and the thermal mass was gargantuan.

Swinchen, one thing to be aware of with fire brick is that it is HEAVY. I was able to find 12 x 12 x 2 fire tiles that I cut to fit my oven. The oven shelf was a bit iffy with the weight, though. I ended up going to a ceramic supplier and buying kiln supports to prop up the bottom shelf.

Remember too, that you'll want 1" clearance on all sides for proper air flow.

If you really want to go crazy reproducing pizzeria style pizza at home, get quarry tiles to create a ceiling on the shelf about 10" above your hearth. That's all you need. A nice thick fire brick hearth, a thick tile ceiling and about an hour preheat at 600. Combine that with a mozzerella/parm, sauce, high protein, lean dough - pulled thin and you've got quintessential NY style pizza.
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Old 10-16-2004, 09:05 PM   #9
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Man that pizza you described sounds good.

I am a little uncertain about using anything that isn't designed for food. An unglazed quarry tile could have toxic binder in it couldnt it?
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Old 10-17-2004, 09:44 AM   #10
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As far as I know, the majority of unglazed quarry tiles are made with non toxic materials. The manufacturer of the tile in question should be able to tell you what it's made out of.

I think that toxicity is much less of an issue than the potential for chips/shards. Not that chipping is all that likely. The majority of people you speak to have no problem with unglazed quarry tiles. I get the feeling maybe 1 out of 50 people have unglazed quarry tiles crack. The number of people that have actually chipped a tooth on a shard is probably less than 1 in 10,000. The price of tiles is around $5 and the price of fire brick is about $10. The extra $5 is definitely worth the additional piece of mind. At least for me it is. I would never forgive myself if someone chipped a tooth because I went with a $5 solution rather than a $10 one.

I know I'm being more than a little repetitive about this. I think, though, that the potential hazards of quarry tiles can't be stressed enough.
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