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Old 06-03-2009, 09:37 PM   #1
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Right mineral oil for cutting board seasoning?

Hi all,

I pulled out an old cutting board of my parents, since the plastic one they're using is too warped to be usable. I cleaned it thoroughly a couple times with Dawn but before using it I figured, after some googling, I should season it first. The only mineral oil available at the market is one by Kroger, labeled "Mineral Oil, USP, Lubricant Laxative." Is this the right type of mineral oil to use to season a cutting board?

What does USP mean? And am I really putting a lubricant laxative on my cutting board?

Thank you for your help.

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Old 06-03-2009, 09:53 PM   #2
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That's exactly what you need. Don't worry about the laxative aspect. You won't be consuming much, if any of the oil as it will soak into the wood.

USP is: About USP

Allow the board to dry completely overnight. Apply a generous coating of the oil to all surfaces - both sides and all edges and leave it overnight. Wipe it dry and use it.
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Old 06-12-2009, 01:38 AM   #3
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Sorry for such a slow reply. Thank you, Andy. I'll go ahead and use the mineral oil then. Just needed some reassurance. And thanks for the USP link.
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Old 06-12-2009, 10:07 AM   #4
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oil for cutting boards is sold in kitchenwares stores as "Food Safe Mineral Oil" Many hardware stores sell it and of course on line it is available.
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Old 06-12-2009, 11:24 AM   #5
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You don't need to buy anything fancier (i.e., more expensive) than the food-grade mineral oil that you saw in the supermarket.
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Old 06-12-2009, 05:52 PM   #6
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The Kroger mineral oil I mentioned in my initial post does not have the words "Food Safe" on it. It does say that it's a "Lubricant Laxative." Is that sufficient or is it important to have the "Food Safe" indication?

Thank you.
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Old 06-12-2009, 06:02 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Loveydovey View Post
The Kroger mineral oil I mentioned in my initial post does not have the words "Food Safe" on it. It does say that it's a "Lubricant Laxative." Is that sufficient or is it important to have the "Food Safe" indication?

Thank you.
It's the right kind. It's a laxative that is taken orally. I was going to say "internally" but realized that could be confusing.

We use it on our new wood cutting board.
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Old 06-13-2009, 05:33 AM   #8
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The terms may sound confusing but you are on the right track. Unless you shop in an hydraulic equipment supply store, what you find in the drug or grocery store is perfect. You may see laxative, food grade, USP or other determinations. All will be crystal clear and food safe. The other mineral oil that is used for hydraulic systems in machinery is usually colored in some form.

You can get a little more water resistant by adding some bees wax to the mix. It adds the additional water repellency, a little sheen and a nice aroma to the kitchen.

Stay away from organic oils like vegetable, olive and nut oils. They will turn rancid.

No matter how you use the mineral oil, just use it. Nothing is sadder than to see a good wood board left untended and on its way to the trash heap.
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Old 06-13-2009, 10:40 AM   #9
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A new board will require frequent oiling, and will absorb quite a bit at first. You may need to oil it daily for a week or so, then every few days, and eventually weekly or even less often, depending on how much you use it and how often you wash it using dish detergent. You'll know when to oil the board by its appearance -- when it looks dry and the color begins to fade, add some oil, rub it around (I use my hand), let it soak in for a few hours or overnight, and rub off any excess (there shouldn't be much, if any, left on the surface) with paper towels. Although you can over oil a board, I think it's pretty hard to do if you use common sense.
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Old 06-13-2009, 03:39 PM   #10
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Thank you everyone for the additional info and reassurance!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Scotch View Post
You'll know when to oil the board by its appearance -- when it looks dry and the color begins to fade
Good to know. Thanks Scotch.
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