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Old 12-12-2016, 02:26 PM   #1
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Roasting pans - tri-ply vs. stainless steel

I'm looking at roasting pans, and trying to determine if tri-ply offers any useful advantages over stainless steel. Amazon has a Cuisinart tri-ply for $65, and SS for $50. I know that for roasting tri-ply does not offer any advantages, but does it help in making gravies or sauces with pan drippings? A 16" pan is way bigger than a burner, and am wondering if tri-ply will do a significantly better job for this. Anyone have any experience?

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Old 12-12-2016, 02:35 PM   #2
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When I make gravy in a roasting pan, I do it over two burners.

I don't think there's any practical difference in pan materials. Your roasting pan serves to catch drippings and to boil liquids for gravy. Not a high stress operation that requires tri-ply such as pan searing meats. Just get a pan that's the right size and is fairly sturdy. A V-rack and handles are helpful. Actually, you can cook a roast on a half-sheet pan with a flat rack.
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Old 12-12-2016, 04:00 PM   #3
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I thought tri-ply reduced hot spots and so cooked more evenly. I'm wondering if that makes it less likely to burn the drippings or not.

Since there's just the two of us, I don't use my big roasting pan a whole lot. It's a Calphalon; I think it's tri-ply, but I honestly don't remember.
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Old 12-12-2016, 04:09 PM   #4
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I'm not sure it really matters, either. I used to have a dedicated roasting pan, but I think it may have ended up at my ex's. Since then, I use a non-stick baking pan and rack combination cobbled together from odds and ends. Honestly, it works as well as anything else I've used, including pans designed for the purpose.

About the only qualifications I look for is a rack that keeps the meat from sitting in the drippings, and a pan underneath that's deep enough to catch them. And if it's easy to clean, that's certainly a plus.
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Old 12-12-2016, 04:16 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
I thought tri-ply reduced hot spots and so cooked more evenly. I'm wondering if that makes it less likely to burn the drippings or not...

If you're careful with the burners, it's really not an issue.
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Old 12-12-2016, 05:38 PM   #6
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This is what I have: Calphalon Classic Nonstick Roaster



It's served well for quite a few years now. I can do a small roast as well as a whole turkey. I use it for pork shoulder, rib roast, turkey, whole chicken... whatever I need.
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Old 12-12-2016, 05:40 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
...Actually, you can cook a roast on a half-sheet pan with a flat rack.
I've used the bottom half of my oven broiler pan set for years, putting the roast/chicken on a cake cooling rack.



When it comes time to make gravy, I put just enough water into the pan to loosen and dissolve the tasty bits. On steady-hand days, I pour it right from the pan into a pot to make gravy, otherwise I use an old, flat-sided soup ladle. At least we used it for soup...when I looked for the image it was called a canning ladle. Ya learn sumpin' every day.
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Old 12-13-2016, 11:02 PM   #8
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If you can spend a few more bucks, you can get a good deal on All Clad SS if you look around after Christmas.

I bought the All Clad 16x13 SS roasting pan a few years ago on a special sale where you also get a SS lasagna pan, lifting forks, and oven mitts.
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Old 12-13-2016, 11:15 PM   #9
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At least we used it for soup...when I looked for the image it was called a canning ladle. Ya learn sumpin' every day.
Me too, CG. I jus' larned me sompin' new!
I had never seen anything like that until yesterday... too funny! and who will be the 3rd poster? You know these always pop up in three's!
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Old 12-15-2016, 07:23 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RPCookin View Post
This is what I have: Calphalon Classic Nonstick Roaster




It's served well for quite a few years now. I can do a small roast as well as a whole turkey. I use it for pork shoulder, rib roast, turkey, whole chicken... whatever I need.

Ours looks the same, except the handles aren't fixed.
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