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Old 02-07-2006, 05:30 PM   #1
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Roasting Pans - worth the splurge?

I do not own one, and it's time. I would love to get a nice $100+ nonstick Calphalon with rack, but really don't have that money to spend right now. I've been seeing some Kitchenaid versions for under $50.

What are the deal breakers for roasting pans? Do they have to be deep? Nonstick a plus? How should the handles be shaped? Should I just splurge and never worry about it again?

Thanks!

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Old 02-07-2006, 05:35 PM   #2
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Mine is a really old enamel one. My Gramma's I think. If I were going to buy a new one I would go for a deep one that would accomodate a large turkey. I wouldn't go with nonstick, because I like to use a wire whisk when I make gravy from the drippings.

Hope that helps you clarify a bit.
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Old 02-07-2006, 06:27 PM   #3
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Yeah listen to Alix. Stay away from the non stick. Not only do you want to be able to use a wisk, but you also want little bits to stick (called fond) to help develop your sauce. Also you want a highly reflective surface for a roasting pan and non stick is anything but reflective.
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Old 02-08-2006, 12:28 PM   #4
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Agreed -- a nonstick roasting pan seems like an oxymoron ....
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Old 02-08-2006, 06:03 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GB
Yeah listen to Alix. Stay away from the non stick. Not only do you want to be able to use a wisk, but you also want little bits to stick (called fond) to help develop your sauce. Also you want a highly reflective surface for a roasting pan and non stick is anything but reflective.
I'm assuming the highly reflective is to get the underside roasted?
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Old 02-08-2006, 08:22 PM   #6
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well I have a heavy aluminum deep roasting pan with non stick coating. I make my gravy in a sauce pan starting with roux and broth and adding the pan drippings later in the process. Nothing goes to waste, it's easy to degrease, and clean up. Never had a problem.

I also have a fancy heavy copper one with steel lining. It makes gravy right in the pan itself. Different technique, very similar results. My heavy aluminum roast was $29 at Linens n Things. My copper roaster was nearly 10x that coast. You can go with an all clad or calphalon top line one for about $100. But think about the options. If it is heavy metal with tall handles, the llining only changes the method not the result. Your drippings will brown because they are in the oven at 325+ for over an hour.
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Old 02-09-2006, 07:48 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Schadenfreude
I'm assuming the highly reflective is to get the underside roasted?
Not only that, but it relects the heat more evenly.
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Old 02-12-2006, 02:32 AM   #8
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Quote:
Mine is a really old enamel one. My Gramma's I think.


Aren't those potentially toxic?
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Old 02-12-2006, 05:20 AM   #9
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I'm actually not real crazy about the 'deep' roasting pans; if the meat sits down in the pan, it's not getting the full direct benefit of the oven heat roasting it, but rather a reflected heat. Of course, if you're using a rack with the pan, that's fine too. I have an old enameled pan I use for smaller cuts and chicken, and for turkeys and larger roasts, I use either my 9x11 aluminum cake pan - - (note it's a Wilton, so cleans up pretty nicely) - or a larger 10 x 13 pan for turkeys. They're both only about 2 1/2 inches high, so all of the roast/turkey stays elevated up out of the pan.

Edited for Jason - They're not toxic if the enamel is in good shape, and they're a great heat conducter.
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Old 02-18-2006, 12:06 PM   #10
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Check out places like a Ross Store or Tuesday Morning. I "made do" without a good roasting pan for years because I didn't think the expense was justified. Then I ran across a Calphalon 16" triply with nonstick rack at Tuesday Morning for $60.00. Didn't even think about it, just bought it. The first time I used it (roast chicken and vegetables for 9 people, all in one pan) I realized what I had been missing.
Whatever you get, be sure it has large upright handles, NOT the kind that fold down for easy storage. You're going to be reaching into a hot oven with mitts on and you want to be able to grab something solid when you do.
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