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Old 01-28-2015, 01:45 PM   #11
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Plastic net

That plastic net that onions come in works well on cast iron and carbon steel. It is hard enough to remove build-up without damaging the finish/patina.
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Old 10-09-2015, 05:41 PM   #12
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Use BonAmi and a bit of elbow grease. Every 5 years I do this on my cast iron pans to remove part of the "cooking patina".
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Old 11-07-2015, 12:19 PM   #13
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I've had a wok for about five months now. It has been fun, and I've made some tasty meals, but seasoning it hasn't worked out quite the way I've been told (and I've read a lot of advice by now). In particular, getting that "lovely no stick patina" has been elusive, although it's gotten to the point where I can get the most stubborn stuck food off just by soaking it in water for a few minutes. Still, bits of seasoning were flaking off even with washing in plain water.

So I followed the video on the previous page for "giving a wok a facial" with salt and oil. That seems to have smoothed out the parts where crud was developing. However, in a few spots, it flaked off to the point where bare metal was visible, surrounded by the blackened area. The question is, is it okay just to continue mini seasonings with more oil, or would people advise scouring the whole bottom to remove the current seasoning and starting everything again at the same level? I've already done that twice (the most recent time was about two months ago), reseasoning it one of those times in the oven, but I always get back to the same point, it seems.
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Old 11-07-2015, 12:37 PM   #14
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Why remove perfectly good seasoning if you don't have to? once you've created a smooth surface around the effected area, just re-season that area.
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Old 11-07-2015, 12:42 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
Why remove perfectly good seasoning if you don't have to? once you've created a smooth surface around the effected area, just re-season that area.
Thanks. That's certainly my instinct. I was just wondering if the seasoning needed to be all at the same level, but maybe that's overthinking it.
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Old 11-07-2015, 12:52 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by notanoid View Post
Thanks. That's certainly my instinct. I was just wondering if the seasoning needed to be all at the same level, but maybe that's overthinking it.
The function of seasoning is to prevent rusting and provide a non-stick surface. As long as you are getting that, you can't ask for more.
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Old 01-08-2016, 09:39 AM   #17
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I have been using carbon steel wok for a long time now may be around 5-8 years. I have never exprience flaking in my carbon steel wok I bought from Bowring.
First , i seasoned the wok with little oil and wipe it with paper towel and turn the stove at high heat until it starts smoking. Wipe again with the oiled paper tower.
Do not cook on carbon steel until the wok is real hot. You don't need a non-stick wok when you cook at high heat and the oil is real hot or almost smoking..
You fry eggs with sticking to the wok if you cook at high heat as describe above.
Wash clean and season before hanging or storing. Once you use many times at high heat (smoking) you don't need to season it anymore.
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