"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Cookware and Accessories > Cookware
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 10-27-2010, 12:29 AM   #1
Head Chef
 
Caslon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Inside the fridge
Posts: 1,705
Seasoning my skillet not going as planned

This 8" cast iron skillet starting sticking because I used some soap. I decided to clean it after umpteen years and reseason it. I've seasoned a wok before.

OK, so I cleaned it out all I wanted to, and per some sites instructions, wiped some Canola oil in the pan and set it upside down in the oven with some foil underneath it. 340 F for an hour.

Taking it out, the oil collected in places on the bottom and sides and turned into a shiny glaze, leaving other areas still dull. It almost looks like sugar glaze at the bottom.

I reduced the heat to 240 and wiped it down again and its in the oven now for another hour. I ditched the idea of keeping it upside down in the oven. That's what I think caused such a build up of glaze in areas.

Needless to say I'm disappointed so far. I may end up starting over and scouring out the skillet again.

Is it normal for that glaze like surface to be kinda...well, thick? Do I need to repeat the process until its glazy like all over?

PS. When I wiped it down again with oil to go in the oven again, I could still see the slightly raised previous shinier areas when shown to the light. I'm pretty sure I didn't use too much oil the first bake, maybe I did. Seems like I did something wrong. Too high a temp?

__________________

__________________
Caslon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-27-2010, 03:51 AM   #2
Executive Chef
 
justplainbill's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Eastern Long Island, New York
Posts: 4,206
My guess is that you're winding up with a somewhate tacky or gummy reddish brown glaze. I've found that at 350F it takes upwards of 4 hours to get the black (carbonized) finish that I want.
__________________

__________________
justplainbill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-27-2010, 04:11 AM   #3
Head Chef
 
Caslon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Inside the fridge
Posts: 1,705
Quote:
Originally Posted by justplainbill View Post
My guess is that you're winding up with a somewhate tacky or gummy reddish brown glaze. I've found that at 350F it takes upwards of 4 hours to get the black (carbonized) finish that I want.
What about the areas of the skillet that still look unseasoned (a dull flat appearance) after the baking process? I don't mind repeating the process, but I don't like how my first "bake" turned out.
__________________
Caslon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-27-2010, 04:18 AM   #4
Executive Chef
 
justplainbill's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Eastern Long Island, New York
Posts: 4,206
In my book, bone dry does not mean unseasoned. For me, a clean well seasoned pan is one that has an even, black, dry and relatively dull finish. Shiney finishes seem prone to rancidity.
__________________
justplainbill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-27-2010, 04:26 AM   #5
Head Chef
 
Caslon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Inside the fridge
Posts: 1,705
That may be true, the oil may have pooled, requiring the skillet be scrubbed down again and the seasoning process started over.
There are squiddly patterned lines of what appears to be pooled areas of oil that got overbaked or something.

Those baked on pooled areas with their weird raised outlines are now permanent unless I scrub them off and start over.
__________________
Caslon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-27-2010, 05:00 AM   #6
Executive Chef
 
justplainbill's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Eastern Long Island, New York
Posts: 4,206
After washing and mechanically drying, you might want to heat pan to insure it is thoroughly dried before greasing / oiling the pan.
__________________
justplainbill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-27-2010, 05:21 AM   #7
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Zhizara's Avatar
Site Moderator
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: New Orleans, LA
Posts: 12,537
I remember buying a cast iron skillet that wasn't already seasoned and the instructions were to put about a 1/2" of oil in the pan and put it in the oven for several hours at a low temp. I think the temp was 200 or 250. Since then I have reseasoned by doing the same thing.

My new 8" skillet came already seasoned! Whenever I use it, usually for cornbread, I spray it liberally with cooking spray before adding my batter. It comes out perfect every time. The reason I did this was the first cornbread didn't quite come out whole, but ever since I started with the cooking spray, it comes out completely in one piece that I can cut into pie wedge pieces.
__________________

If you can't see the bright side of life, polish the dull side.
Zhizara is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-27-2010, 06:06 AM   #8
Head Chef
 
Caslon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Inside the fridge
Posts: 1,705
I found that lightly coating a cleaned skillet with oil at 350F face down, for an hour, is not the ideal way to season a cleaned out skillet.

More than a few sites mention 350F for an hour to season. That probably may have been way too hot?
__________________
Caslon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-27-2010, 08:20 AM   #9
Head Chef
 
letscook's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Finger Lakes of NY
Posts: 1,879
Put some oil in it and if you have a gas grill take it out side and let it "cook" on the gas grill (won't stink up the house) I do mine this way all the time - works great.
__________________
One day your life will flash before your eyes. Make sure it's worth watching
letscook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-27-2010, 08:59 AM   #10
Chief Eating Officer
 
GB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: USA,Massachusetts
Posts: 25,509
It definitely was not too hot. If anything it was too cool. I am confused as to how you think it being upside down contributed to pooling. the reason you turn the pan upside down is so that the fat has a harder time pooling as gravity will force it to not pool.

Pooling happens when too much fat is used. You should just wipe a very thin layer on it.
__________________

__________________
You know you can't resist clicking
this link. Your eyes will thank you. VISUAL BLISS
GB is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:41 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.