"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Cookware and Accessories > Cookware
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 05-27-2005, 07:20 PM   #1
Sous Chef
 
IcyMist's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Florida
Posts: 682
Silpat Questions

I just purchased my first 2 silpats and wanted to find out if there is anything special I will need to remember about using one?

Do I need to be more careful with heat or how long it cooks?

Any special cleaning instructions?

I already know you aren't suppose to use grease, cut or fold them. But any thoughts and experiences would be appreciated. These things are too expensive to ruin one because I didn't know something important.

__________________

__________________
IcyMist is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2005, 08:21 PM   #2
Sous Chef
 
RPCookin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Long Island, Bahamas
Posts: 629
I don't know a lot about them, but we used them to make cookies for dessert cups (for ice cream) in cooking school last week. The oven was at 350 F., and they were cooked for 8-10 minutes. Not much help, but it's the first time I ever used them... they are great for this application, as we had to get the flat cookies off the pads quickly and form the cups over the bottom of a glass before they hardened. There wasn't even a threat of them sticking...
__________________

__________________
Rick
RPCookin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2005, 09:07 PM   #3
 
HanArt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Louisiana
Posts: 272
I can't get over the eeewww factor with those things. They just feel creepy to me. I'd rather use parchment paper.
__________________
HanArt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2005, 11:14 PM   #4
Master Chef
 
Michael in FtW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Fort Worth, TX
Posts: 6,594
IcyMist - read the instructions that came with your [sic] "silpat" mats. Silpat is actually a trademark/brand name - silicone impregnated mats are the same thing basically - depending on how they are made. Care and use depends on the composition - and that is variable by manufacturer.

LOL HanArt - do you know what parchment paper is? It's silicone impregnated tissue paper. It's essentially the same thing as a "SilPat" baking mat - just not as durable.
__________________
"It ain't what you don't know that gets you in trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so." - Mark Twain
Michael in FtW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-28-2005, 05:00 AM   #5
Sous Chef
 
IcyMist's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Florida
Posts: 682
Thanks everybody, appreciate the answers. Note to Self....toss the parchment paper in toilet.
__________________
IcyMist is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-28-2005, 12:30 PM   #6
 
HanArt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Louisiana
Posts: 272
Michael, silicone-coated paper has a completely different feel. I can handle that and I can handle silicone cooking utensils like brushes and spatulas, but not interested in the bakeware or Silpat sheets. Like I said, it's the eeewww factor.
__________________
HanArt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-20-2005, 09:28 PM   #7
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 16
Has anyone found any info regarding health safety? Seems like most plastic is considered BAD (carginogenic, distupting normal hormones, etc.). obviously this is not the same as the plastics, but I would like to read some scientific info.
__________________
lorie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-21-2005, 12:11 AM   #8
Master Chef
 
Michael in FtW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Fort Worth, TX
Posts: 6,594
Lorie - unless you have a MS or PhD in Chemistry, and a copy of the CRC Handbook ... you're probably not going to understand the "scientific info". But, you can go to www.fda.gov and weed your way through the material and you'll eventually find everything "scientific" you want to know.

There are many forms of silicone (sand and oxygen) with various additives which makes silicone versitile for various uses - 1,200 or more. Some are medical grade (like breast and testicular implants), some are for sealing compounds which are toxic if ingested, there are some used as food additives, and some like the coating on parchment paper and silicone baking mats are food grade and non-reactive with foods.

Food grade silicone is non-toxic and safe - if you follow the instructions (mainly the temperature range). It has to be tested and approved by the FDA to be sold in the US. The original silicone baking mats (Silpat) and silicone baking pans were developed in France - which has a tougher testing standard than the FDA when it comes to food safety.

Yeah, as HanArt said - it's got that "ewwwwww" factor - like candy gummy worms.
__________________
"It ain't what you don't know that gets you in trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so." - Mark Twain
Michael in FtW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-21-2005, 09:10 AM   #9
Head Chef
 
Yakuta's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Chicago
Posts: 1,208
I like my silpat. Yes initially when you are not used to it, the feeling is a bit strange. They appear to feel greasy even after you wash them with warm water or wipe them down.

I however love to bake with them and also love to use them to cool my chocolate covered biscotti's and other cookies.

Nothing seems to stick on them. They are pricey but are well worth it if you are really into baking. I have had mine for almost 4 years now.

I have parchment as well but Silpat's are just more convenient to me because they lie much flatter and it's easier to mold sticky dough (like biscotti loaves). Parchment keeps raising up and can be a frustration sometimes to get down correctly on a tray without greasing.
__________________
Yakuta is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-21-2005, 05:10 PM   #10
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 16
Michael in FtW,
Thanks so much for the info.
__________________

__________________
lorie is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

RV & Travel Trailer Communities

Our RV & Travel Trailer sites encompasses virtually all types of Recreational Vehicles, from brand-specific to general RV communities.

» More about our RV Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002-2012 Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:43 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Cooking News & Tips Straight to your Email!

Stay up-to-date with Cooking info to your inbox!

unsusbcribe at anytime with one click

Close [X]