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Old 04-17-2007, 07:52 AM   #11
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Nattie:

I didn't realize you were in Australia. I was thinking about US brands such as All-Clad, Cuisinart, Calphalon, LeGourmet Chef, etc.

In Australia, is there tri-ply cookware available? That is, a SS and alum. sandwich of metal for the entire pot body.
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Old 04-17-2007, 08:06 AM   #12
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here is the site for the SS pots i was looking at

Matchbox - Esteele

it doesn't look like they are tri-ply but i believe you can get that here... (and calphalon) - does it give that much better performance?
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Old 04-17-2007, 08:22 AM   #13
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If you have a gas stove and turn the flame up to a higher temp, the flame can reach beyond the edge of the disk and scorch the food in the pot. This is a problem with smaller pots and pans. With an electric stove, you should notice little or no difference.
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Old 04-17-2007, 08:34 AM   #14
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Sorry - not sure I understood correctly (I do have a gas stove!) - do you mean that a downside of the copper disc base, that is not encased in SS, is what you described - hence the tri-ply is superior in these instances? I don't quite get why if the flame-range is larger than the disc size, this will scorch the food; particularly if the sides are SS, which is a bad conducter?
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Old 04-17-2007, 09:17 AM   #15
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Plain SS (one layer) is a poor conductor. This can result in some foods burning in they are exposed to high heat. That's why there are disks on the bottom or tri-ply.

If you have a small pot, 1 quart for example, the disk on thebottom is small because the pot is small. If the gas flame is turned up too high. The flame will extend beyond theedge of the disk and hit the single ply ss on the sides of the pot. With larger pots this is not as much of a problem. You just have to be careful.
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Old 04-18-2007, 07:51 AM   #16
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I asked a few people today about the advantages of having eg. aluminium sandwiched between stainless steel for the whole pot, as opposed to having eg. a copper base, but didn't really get any clear answer. What's the advantages of tri-ply (vs. a copper base)? Obviously this helps the sides heat up too? but what sort of cooking would this be necessary for?
Thanks!
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Old 04-18-2007, 08:36 AM   #17
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I tried to explain that in my last post. Even distribution of the heat prevents possible burning if gas flames reach beyond the edge of the disk and hit the plain SS side. Tri-ply prevents that.
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Old 04-18-2007, 08:39 AM   #18
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Ah! Thanks Andy - sorry, I didn't put two and two together - didn't realise the previous answer was pertaining directly to the advantage of tri-ply. silly me!
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Old 04-18-2007, 08:44 AM   #19
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Sometimes my explanations could be clearer. Good luck with your purchase.
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Old 04-18-2007, 10:56 AM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M.
When you consider SS, you should look at tri-ply layered SS. The entire pan body is two layers of SS with a layer of Aluminum in between. This is the best option for SS and it's the best option IMO.
I took Andy's advice on this one. I bought 2 All Clad fry pans and they work great. My DW bought me a Cuisinart SS 12" fry which is a thin pan with a copper/stainless plate on the bottom. I'll grab the All Clads first, the Cuisinart is a great pan but it doesn't have the even heating as the All Clads. Also, the interior of the Cuisinart is a little more smoother which causes some sticking. Both are very easy to clean and easy to work with.

Cookware & More : All-Clad Irregulars courtesy Jennyma, offers "Irregular" All Clad cookware. There's supposed to be a cosmetic defect, like a small scratch or something, but I couldn't see anything on my pans. Even if there was some scratch, they're loaded with them now.
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