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Old 04-04-2013, 02:39 PM   #1
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Stones not specifically made for food?

I have seen many use stoneware that is intended for other purposes than food. For example, kiln shelves for pizza. Is this safe? How do you know if the stone you use as an alternative is safe or lead free so that it can be used with food?

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Old 04-04-2013, 02:53 PM   #2
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This is a concern as stones made for food must be free of toxic ingredients. This is difficult to determine among stones specifically made for non-food use because it's just not an issue for a kiln shelf or a paving stone.

So you can buy a kiln shelf or unglazed quarry tiles for a pizza stone but there is no assurance they are food safe.

I wonder if you go to a place like Home Depot/Lowes or a tile specialist, they even know the answer to that question because no one needs that information in the target businesses. My fear is someone may tell you a product is food safe without actually knowing.
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Old 04-04-2013, 03:37 PM   #3
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The only thing I have learned is that you should never use red unglazed tiles. More than likely, they have lead in them. And any acid in the food will cause it to leach out and contaminate the food. The problem with using these type tiles is that you don't know where the clay comes from in the production of them.

There are craft artists that use safe clay to make items that are safe for food. Aside from buying an expensive one from a reputable seller, you could commission one from one of these craft artists.
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Old 04-04-2013, 04:59 PM   #4
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To save $50 to $350 I would not run the risk. Life's short enough as it is.
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Old 04-04-2013, 06:11 PM   #5
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Well, if it were actually a stone and not pottery, it shouldn't have any added lead, etc.
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Old 04-05-2013, 12:22 AM   #6
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go to a hardware store and buy a lead testing kit if you're really determined to try something out.
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Old 04-05-2013, 12:46 AM   #7
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Quote:
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Well, if it were actually a stone and not pottery, it shouldn't have any added lead, etc.
Yes.

Due to sketchy "countries of origin" I too would be weary of just throwing anything in the oven/grill, and going with it.
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Old 04-05-2013, 08:13 AM   #8
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Well, if it were actually a stone and not pottery, it shouldn't have any added lead, etc.
Clays can have naturally occurring lead.
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Old 04-05-2013, 08:22 AM   #9
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Has anybody used stones from sink cutouts in granite stone counter tops? These are available for the asking and need only the polishing of the edges. Some installers leave the polished cutouts when installing.
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Old 04-05-2013, 08:41 AM   #10
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We had ours made into a lazy susan for the kitchen TV.
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Old 04-05-2013, 09:50 AM   #11
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Well, if it were actually a stone and not pottery, it shouldn't have any added lead, etc.
A real concern about stone is if it is dry. You stick a wet stone in the oven and let it get to 550F and it will explode.

Dry means geologically, not just surface dryness. I put a charcoal chimney full of coals down on our new patio while dealing with the other. Took about 20 seconds for the surface to explode. There is now a round indention in the stone. Thankfully this is not a smooth stone thing so it blends okish.
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Old 04-05-2013, 10:11 AM   #12
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A real concern about stone is if it is dry. You stick a wet stone in the oven and let it get to 550F and it will explode.

Dry means geologically, not just surface dryness. I put a charcoal chimney full of coals down on our new patio while dealing with the other. Took about 20 seconds for the surface to explode. There is now a round indention in the stone. Thankfully this is not a smooth stone thing so it blends okish.
That's why you aren't supposed to build fireplaces/chimneys with river stones.
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Old 04-05-2013, 10:24 AM   #13
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...Dry means geologically, not just surface dryness...

Can you please explain what this means/how you can tell?
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Old 04-05-2013, 10:27 PM   #14
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Thanks everyone. Lead wasn't my only concern. It was just an example. I would like to hear more in this topic. It's very interesting. Sounds like you really need to know what you are doing if you use something other than stones intended for cooking.
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Old 04-05-2013, 10:53 PM   #15
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when i was a young scout, some of the bad kids learned to soak small stones such as slate in water and then toss them into the campfire. it's was just fun for all when they exploded!
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Old 04-06-2013, 12:09 AM   #16
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Can you please explain what this means/how you can tell?
As I understand it means there is no moisture trapped in the stone, even in itty bitty bits. I am not a geologist though.

It was something I read about 3 months before exploding the patio.
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Old 04-06-2013, 09:08 AM   #17
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As I understand it means there is no moisture trapped in the stone, even in itty bitty bits. I am not a geologist though.

It was something I read about 3 months before exploding the patio.
Thanks, Frank. It seems there is no way to know so it's a crap shoot.
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Old 04-06-2013, 10:54 AM   #18
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Would seem unlikely that unfractured igneous rock would contain moisture.
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Old 04-06-2013, 11:45 AM   #19
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I don't know what the patio is, something blueish.

Different rock has different porosity. I was going to take a geology course this semester but it was full when I went to sign up. I took Cultural Geography instead.
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Old 04-06-2013, 01:19 PM   #20
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Would seem unlikely that unfractured igneous rock would contain moisture.
Like pumice?





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