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Old 10-15-2008, 08:35 AM   #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pacanis View Post
...And nobody said I wouldn't eat the corn bread
don't eat the corn bread. Don't do that to yourself.
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Old 10-15-2008, 09:28 AM   #32
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Originally Posted by Callisto in NC View Post
don't eat the corn bread. Don't do that to yourself.


One night..... I was hungry for something sweet and cookie-like and the only thing I had on hand that met those requirements was corn bread...... and chocolate syrup
It will do in a pinch
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Old 10-15-2008, 10:04 AM   #33
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I always like to do a little deep-frying or pan-frying in a CI pan to help the seasoning process.

If I'm at work, I cheat. I have a little CI "sizzle platter" type thing, like what fajitas are served on. I'll clean it, dry it over low heat on the stovetop, then, using a towel wrapped around the handle, and dunk the whole darn thing into the deep-fryer. I then take it out, and wipe it down with a couple paper towels, then flip it up-side-down and place it in the salamander at the lowest setting to bake the oil on.
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Old 10-15-2008, 11:04 AM   #34
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Originally Posted by pacanis View Post


One night..... I was hungry for something sweet and cookie-like and the only thing I had on hand that met those requirements was corn bread...... and chocolate syrup
It will do in a pinch
All I'm saying is don't tempt yourself. Make cornbread to season the pan and throw it out THEN make a batch you can eat. Just don't eat the batch that you make for seasoning. Think of it like drinking the dishwater. The dishes are clean, but the water isn't.
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Old 10-21-2008, 06:34 PM   #35
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Sorry I checked in here so late in the thread. I use an 8" (20cm) black (carbon) steel pan for eggs. Actually, I have two of 'em. One is fairly thin, and light. Nice for flipping. The other is heavier, almost as heavy as a CI one would be. Both have a nice slope to the sides, and they were cheap. Under $15 new, or $4 used in a thrift. Cure just like CI, and they are slick, no stick. They also go from stovetop to broiler very nicely.
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Old 10-23-2008, 07:49 PM   #36
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First flip!!!

I tried using my new pan as-is for about a week, and it was a disaster. The eggs stuck to the pan like Velcro. "Pre-seasoned" doesn't really mean much. So I did a proper seasoning in the oven and tried again.

On my first attempt I used 3 eggs, and it was a bit too much mass to get over with my "normal" flipping technique, and I ended up with a half-folded, scrambled mess.

This morning I tried again with 2 eggs, and I flipped it successfully. The wrist motion is really different from that of a non-stick. The eggs will release, but they don't really slide. On my Teflon pan once I had them loosened I could move my wrist in a circular motion and the eggs would just slide around like they were on bearings. Flipping from Teflon required just a quick forward-and-back flick to get the eggs over.

Flipping in this Lodge pan requires more of a up-and-over motion, since I have to propel the eggs upward instead of relying on the far lip of the pan to do it for me.

Anyway, the omelet was a success! I still need to make a few more before I get the feel for it, but I like eating them, so that's not a bad thing. Off to get myself some crab meat and avocados . . . :)

Video may follow later, if I get ambitious.
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Old 10-24-2008, 09:47 PM   #37
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Ooh...I had to drive across town this morning to pick up a check for some computer/network work I did, a big five minute ride, so I stopped at my favorite in-town thrift on the way. Picked up a slightly burnt 22 cm (8-5/8") French black steel fry pan. Riveted steel handle. Boiled it in a pot of water with heavy duty degreasing Dawn and then scrubbed a bit with Scotchbrite. A light scrape with my griddle spatula, and it's like new. I left the bottom as is. It is in the oven now, curing with olive oil, for all you vegetarians. Medium weight, not heavy like a blini pan, not thin like the black steel that is coming out of China these days. Perfect egg pan...low, shallow sides for fast cooking, easy flipping. Handle long enough to go in the broiler to finish the cheese on top of my omelet. $1+7 for Ahnold.**Update...I just fried and flipped a pair of eggs in it. Nice. I'll try an omelet in the morning. Oh, and I always spelled omelette like that, but spell check says I'm a...bad speller.
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Old 10-27-2008, 04:07 PM   #38
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The pan is improving with use. Now that I've been using it pretty regularly for about a week (since properly seasoning it), it's definitely loosening up, so to speak. I made two omelets this morning, and they were definitely sliding in the pan. I still have to work on my heat control, though. The first omelet was nearly perfect, but the second was a little browned because I let the pan get too hot.
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