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Old 12-06-2013, 06:41 PM   #11
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Do people with woks clean out the carbon build up? I used to never clean out my wok. I've seen professional woks in kitchens that look as if they never had or ever will get a carbon removal cleanup. Is that because woks are stainless steel or something?
Woks are mostly carbon steel. properly seasoned they should look black but not with a thick build up.
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Old 12-06-2013, 06:44 PM   #12
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Do people with woks clean out the carbon build up? I used to never clean out my wok. I've seen professional woks in kitchens that look as if they never had or ever will get a carbon removal cleanup. Is that because woks are stainless steel or something?
Most woks are carbon steel. When properly seasoned, the surface should be black and smooth with no build up
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Old 12-06-2013, 07:51 PM   #13
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My CI tip is don't buy CI that is too heavy for you to handle.
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Old 05-11-2014, 11:15 PM   #14
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Wok cleaning and cast iron cleaning are pretty close.

Cast iron cooking bakes IN the nonstick, whereas manufactured nonstick bakes OUT.
There is a belief that the wok, with all that has been cooked in it, imparts life to the pan.
I refer you to "Breath of A Wok", or Grace Young YouTube videos for more on this.

Both are cleansed with brush and water, only.
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Old 05-12-2014, 08:31 AM   #15
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My CI tip is don't buy CI that is too heavy for you to handle.
Oh how true. Now at my age, a simple 8-10 inch CI pan is about all I can lift with food. Not worth the purchase. Remember as you get older, the pan gets heavier. All by itself.
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Old 05-12-2014, 12:02 PM   #16
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I don't want the CI tip. I want the CI rib steak. (I can just see P.A.G. rolling her eyes right now.)

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Old 05-14-2014, 02:39 PM   #17
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My cast iron pans mostly take care of themselves. At worst, I add some water to the pan and bring it to a boil, then pour it out and use an old plastic scrubber that is near end of life (because the heat will ruin it). By now the pan has cooled off a bit, I run warm water over the pan and scrub it for a while.

Then I dry it off with a rag and let it sit until the residual moisture evaporates and put it away. So what if it still has some stuff on it? If it didn't scrub off then it will either cook off in the future, or it won't. Either way, makes no difference. At least not to me.

Clean the outside? Why?

My usual every day cleaning is to let some water sit in the pan after cooking, then run a plastic scrubber over it and put it away. Cast iron: the original non-stick cook pots and pans.
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Old 05-14-2014, 03:50 PM   #18
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Greg, as the gunk builds up on the outside, you can take your CI and put it on the hot coals of your grill when you are done cooking. It will burn off all that gunk. Or at the least soften it so you can just scrap it off. Just put the CI item on the coals and put the cover on. Let the heat do its work.
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Old 05-14-2014, 04:49 PM   #19
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Greg, I clean the outside of all my pots and pans because they can get slippery with grease, making them difficult to hold on to. That can be dangerous.

Being a guy, you likely have much more hand strength than women, so this might not be a problem for you.

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Old 05-14-2014, 06:18 PM   #20
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Greg, as the gunk builds up on the outside, you can take your CI and put it on the hot coals of your grill when you are done cooking. It will burn off all that gunk. Or at the least soften it so you can just scrap it off. Just put the CI item on the coals and put the cover on. Let the heat do its work.
I saw that quote. I cook on natural gas. Build-up of any sort has not been a problem for me. But I'll keep the coals suggestion in mind.

It seems reasonable that the gunk on the outside of the pan is carbon, and carbon is the non-stick surface, and hot coals are hot carbon. It would probably help to do the same thing but with the cooking surface down as another method of restoring your cast iron pan.

CI pans amaze me since they've been around so long, hundreds of years, and yet they perform in many cases as well as modern high-tech non-stick surfaces.
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