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Old 11-14-2007, 02:10 PM   #21
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6", wow, where did you find pan that small, I don't know if I ever seen one that small.
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Old 11-14-2007, 03:36 PM   #22
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Charlie,

Oops,

It was 8", 10", and 12"
8" is labeled NSF 80114/100 Restaurant cookware.
I got mine on ebay a few years ago.
I love the tapered sides - you can safely do the flip without getting food everywhere.
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Old 11-14-2007, 06:02 PM   #23
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Anodizing, though usually performed through electrolisis, can be done chemically by using substances with a negative charge with respect to the aluminum. Alkalyes, I believe have negative polarity.

When I worked for Lokheed, we anodized aluminum parts used on the U.S. Navy's D.S.R.V. as the first line protection against the corrosive nature of sea-water. A substance was mixed into fresh water, and the aluminum parts were dipped in the solution. They came out with an anodized finish.

As for anodized cookware, the outer surface of the cookware is anodized to preserve the beauty of the cookwear. That surface resists stains and scratches due to the surface being harder than the underlying aluminum (a very soft metal). The interior can be untreated aluminum, aluminum alloy, or have any number of non-stick coatings applied to it.

Plain aluminum cookware has been used as mainstays in resaurant cookwear for several decades. It is light, strong, and transmits even heat quickly to foods. It will react with acidic or alkaye foods, creating corrsion in the pot or pan.

Unknown to most, corrosion is caused by the migration of electrons from one material to another, and involves oxidation of the metal. As electrons are leached from the parent metal, they bind with oxygen, degrading and weakening the metal. Water, salt water, acids, and bases are naturally conductive mediums that accelerate the ion transfers, speeding the corrosion process.

Many acids and alkalies are strong enough to cause the same reactions on bodily tissues, especially mteh membranes of the eyes, and nasal passages. Chemical burns are a form of this action. Caustic materials we are familiar with include lye, hydrochloric acid, suphuric acid, lyme. etc.

Sainless steel is relatively inert, that is, it is a stable compound that resists corrosion. Iron (as in cast iron) is highly susceptable to corrosion, as are aluminum and copper. Glass and ceramics are impervious to corrosive substances.

The inner surface of your pot or pan, unless coated with non-stick, or seasoned with an impenetrable layer of plasticized oil (seasoned cast iron) will rust or corrode when used with acidic foods (tomatoes, pineapple, citrus, etc.), or alkalie foods (baking powder, baking soda, harsh soaps, etc.).

So in summary, the anodizing does not refer to the inner cooking surface, but rather to the outer surface of your pot or pan.

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Old 11-14-2007, 06:58 PM   #24
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A hard anodized pan is an excellent pan. However, so many now have been further stick free treated. Look for the calphalon one line of infuzed anodized pans or their original professional line (very hard to find now) Like so many other companies these days, much of their product is now made in China and ... they ahve lesser lines for various stores etc.
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Old 11-15-2007, 08:26 AM   #25
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Thank you all for all of your help. Now here is a question - I checked out the stock pot that I have, the only piece of anodized cookware that I own. The inside is a different color than the outside - the outside is a dark color the inside is lighter - and could be considered shiny in some small spots. The bottom is lighter than the sides. I use this pot for boiling water, making spaghetti sauce (I call it gravy), and soup - beef barley and chicken. This pot is about 10 years old. Is this the aluminum I am seeing? Is this pot still safe to use?
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Old 11-15-2007, 08:38 AM   #26
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it`s very likely that it Is alu that you`re seeing yes :)
you`ll find that it`s Quite safe to use (as long as it hasn`t worn dangerously thin to present a Mechanical failure).

it`s no more dangerous than using Alu foil or most Pressure cookers and the like.

you`ll get More Alu in your system from a cup of Tea, than the same liquid equiv cooked in there :)

edited to add: a Well known antacid called Aludrox is a suspension of Alu hydroxide in some minty water, it reacts with excess stomach acid to make alu chloride (quite soluble!), it is NOT toxic :)
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Old 11-15-2007, 08:40 AM   #27
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Thanks Y2 - as long as it is safe I will keep using it - it is one of my favorites -obviously!
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Old 11-16-2007, 12:00 PM   #28
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Hi,

This is my first post, and I have two questions pertaining to this thread -

1. It's been said that anodizing makes the aluminum more scratch-resistant than stainless steel; however, whenever I've looked at anodized pots in a discount store, where they've been banged around a bit, as they would be in a kitchen, they're always scratched - and it seems to be more noticeable than it would be on stainless.

2. It was also mentioned that the anodizing takes place only on the outside, to protect the finish - but my understanding is that it takes place on the inside as well, and that this results in a relatively non-stick surface (apart from pans lined with a true non-stick coating, of course). If the insides aren't anodized as well, why are they as dark as the outsides?

I need to buy cookware, and I'm trying to decide which kind I want. I've picked up a few consistent opinions from this and other websites - don't buy a set, and don't bother with non-stick except for frying pans. I know that everyone loves cast iron, but it's just too heavy, and All Clad, but it's outside of my budget, even at discount prices. I was going to buy the Cuisinart Chef's Classic stainless, but I noticed that IKEA has a clad line called Favorit, at very reasonable prices. Has anyone had any experience with their cookware?

Between anodized and clad - which would you recommend?

Also - does anyone have reservations about aluminum in light of recent research suggesting a link between aluminum and Alzheimer's?

Thanks very much.
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Old 11-16-2007, 12:04 PM   #29
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One other thing - glass vs. metal lids. Any preference?
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Old 11-16-2007, 12:09 PM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jeyges View Post
Also - does anyone have reservations about aluminum in light of recent research suggesting a link between aluminum and Alzheimer's?

Thanks very much.
non at all, Correlation and Causality are Mutually exclusive for the most part.
Yes elevated levels of Al has been found in the brains of people afflicted with this disease, there is No evidence to support that it is the Cause of it however, any more than loosing your hair makes you Radioactive :)

Pop-Science and sensationalism that sells tabloids and rag-mags really isn`t a trustworthy source!
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