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Old 02-13-2009, 02:27 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by Vermin8 View Post
I think I'll go for the pure - it seems like coated is something that could chip and degrade and unless it enhances heat distribution - which doesn't make sense since cast iron is supposed to be one of the best.
I honestly don't know how long they've been coating cast iron, I haven't had a need to look it up, but I believe like you that it could chip. I do know, however, that pure cast iron with no coating can and has lasted 100 years plus. I know pure cast iron, properly cared for will last my granddaughter's lifetime (when I have one). I'm using my grandmothers' DO so I trust the uncoated. JMO.
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Old 02-13-2009, 02:35 PM   #12
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Those of us from the Deep South love our cast iron ... skillets, bakers, dutch ovens, cornbread sticks, muffin pans, etc. Many things, cornbread chief among them, are close to impossible to cook correctly without them. There are two disadvantages to uncoated cast iron that I know of. One, you absolutely cannot cook anything sweet in them or whatever you bake in them after that will stick. Secondly, you cannot cook very acidic things in them, without risking a metallic taste developing. You can cook something acidic very, very briefly without a problem, however.

If you go with plain cast iron, especially if you use them for baking or frying, remember that they do not like water or soap. Instead, after use, wipe them out thoroughly and perhaps add a bit of oil and put them away. If, after several years use, they develop a sort of burned crust that becomes excessive, the classic way to deal with that was to put them in the fireplace and "burn them out" about once every 3-4 years. Then, clean them up good and re-oil them and you are good to go for several more years.
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Old 02-13-2009, 02:58 PM   #13
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remember that they do not like water or soap. Instead after use wipe them out thoroughly and perhaps add a bit of oil and put them away
This is extremely untrue. Cast iron handles water wonderfully as long as you dry it completely afterwards. If you allow it to sit in water, you have a problem but you can, very much, rinse it with water after every use. The instructions that came with all of mine say to do exactly that. Example, today I seared pork before putting it in the crock. If I don't rinse off the CI, I risk cross contamination because wiping isn't enough.

Soap, no. Water, definitely. Just don't place a screaming hot CI pan in cold water. Here's the Lodge link to how to clean.
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Old 02-13-2009, 03:14 PM   #14
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Well, mine didnt come with directions, they all came from Mother, Grandmother, and some were from Great-Grandmother, and I dare say none of them ever saw water, except perhaps by accident. To each his/her own.
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Old 02-13-2009, 03:20 PM   #15
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Well, mine didnt come with directions, they all came from Mother, Grandmother, and some were from Great-Grandmother, and I dare say none of them ever saw water, except perhaps by accident. To each his/her own.
Well, since we are talking apples and oranges, yours has a hard and true seasoning and the OP is buying new, the OP should go by current practices and standards. Our grandparents and parents didn't have the same concerns we face now. The new cookware does need to be cleaned with water. I clean my grandmothers with water and it is still as strong as ever. It's soap that is the death nell for CI.

Vermin8 ~ are you looking for more than just a DO like skillets or a flat pan?
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Old 02-13-2009, 03:41 PM   #16
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Thank You for Your Opinion. I'm sorry I attempted to share what I know to be true.
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Old 02-13-2009, 03:56 PM   #17
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I just bought a 3.5 quart Martha Stewart (I hate myself for admitting that, but it was the cheapest I could find and seemed like nicer quality)

It's enough for what I want now. I had a 6 quart, and it was heavy and hard to move in and out of the stove. (wife got it in divorce)

Anyway, I love the coated, and this one does fit snugly and the top has the raised bumps to equally distribute moisture back into the dish.

I just made a jumbalaya that was soooooo good following a show of Good Eats with Alton. It wasn't just hot, it had a lot of the flavor and they weren't muddled altogether like a lot of Jumbalaya gets.
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Old 02-13-2009, 04:16 PM   #18
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Thank You for Your Opinion. I'm sorry I attempted to share what I know to be true.
No need to be sorry. We are talking different styles whereas you were raised one way, others were raised another. I know of some who would say to use soap, even though it is against the manufacturers instructions that I posted. Maybe it's a northern verses southern thing because my pans are all handed down from my northern grandmother and she used water on them all the time.

Again, to get back on track. Vermin8 ~ are you considering other pieces or just the DO? Vermin, I did just notice you asked about marinara, that shouldn't be done in a new uncoated DO. It will eat the seasoning. Now, if your DO is over 50 years old, then you're fine. Have you considered going to the Goodwill or thrift store to look for CI?

Greg Woulf ~ in this economy no one should fault you for being frugal. I looked around for the best deal on my Lodge and ended up at Walmart. I know some think Walmart is the devil's handmaiden but for $10 less a pan, I'm not going to thumb my nose at them. How are you liking the coated?
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Old 02-13-2009, 04:20 PM   #19
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In my area nice cast iron skillets, etc can still be found at flea markets and junk shops, and while they are no longer cheap like they used to be, they are, in my most humble opinion, superior to the new ones. That is where I would look first, unless I had in mind a coated one.
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Old 02-13-2009, 04:24 PM   #20
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I was planning on the DO for now and possibly a skillet for cornbread (DH loves the buttermilk cornbread his mom used to make).
I was considering marinara w/meatballs (marinara on it's own, no), but if that's not adviced I won't do it.
I've also read it should be seasoned with oil before cooking.
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